Pre-trip inspection after a post trip requirements

Discussion in 'Trucking Industry Regulations' started by dlstruck, Jan 28, 2018.

  1. Assured

    Assured Light Load Member

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    It looks to me like you really should be a lot more careful about scheduling. If for a routine work week, all 4200 minutes need to count, sooner or later the problems are going to find a way to catch up with you and your driver.
     
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  3. LilBudyWizer

    LilBudyWizer Light Load Member

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    I don't believe you're required to do an inspection, just certify the vehicle is in proper working condition. If you didn't actually inspect it then you falsified that report. If you did an inspection but wasn't on-duty then you falsified your logs. Likely if you pass an inspection then they don't care. If you fail an inspection you'll likely just get a ticket for failing the inspection. My understanding is the inspection and report is the drivers protection. You're aware of the problem, you reported it to the company and they required you to drive. That is not protection in the event of an accident due to faulty equipment but rather just in the event of failing an inspection. Good luck with that. Is there any problems with the vehicle. Why yes officer, I found this problem during my inspection, notified my company and was told to drive anyway. See, here's my inspection report leaving no question that I notified my company. Here's the message on my QUALCOMM telling me to drive anyway. I did not deem it an emanate risk to safety so drove when instructed to do so.
     
    dirthaller Thanks this.
  4. 1DemonDeacon

    1DemonDeacon Bobtail Member

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    Aug 29, 2018
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    So let's get to the basics. According to the FMCSR's, there is no requirements nor regulations that dictate a driver must be "on-duty" for a Pre or Post-Trip Inspection. The requirement to be "on-duty" is implemented by the company, only. A motor carrier can supersede the regulations but never not abide by them. Regulations simply state that a driver must perform an inspection prior to operating the vehicle to ensure that it is in safe proper working condition (Part 392.7). In Part 396.11 it states that a driver must perform in writing to the company any defects on each vehicle driven for that day.

    Every motor carrier reserves the right to implement their own policy for Pre & Post-Trip Inspection requirements. This is where the 15, 30, or whatever the time limit is set by the company and drivers follow according to company policy.

    Hope this clears the subject up a little more.
     
  5. REO6205

    REO6205 Trucker Forum STAFF Staff Member

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    From one owner to another...cover your butt. Have the driver show a pre trip and a post trip. We give our drivers fifteen minutes for each. DOT likes this.
    If a half an hour a day is going to kill our hauling schedule we need to look harder at how we dispatch.
     
  6. Ridgeline

    Ridgeline Road Train Member

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    SERIOUSLY?

    Let's.

    WRONG!

    I will tell you why in a moment.

    WRONG AGAIN!

    ALL the other things you posted are wrong.

    Here is the problem -

    ANYTHING THAT THE DRIVER DOES INSPECT A TRUCK, ANYTHING IS RECORDED AS ON-DUTY NOT DRIVING.

    While the two regs you posted have something to do with inspection but 395.2 definitions in section 395 - recording of hours of service trumps it all. It states the following -

    On-duty time means all time from the time a driver begins to work or is required to be in readiness to work until the time the driver is relieved from work and all responsibility for performing work. On-duty time shall include:

    [...]

    (2) All time inspecting, servicing, or conditioning any commercial motor vehicle at any time;
     
  7. Allow Me.

    Allow Me. Trucker Forum STAFF Staff Member

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    In the old days we used to "flag" a pre-trip if it took less than 7 min. Also, if you drove the same equipment including trailer daily, you could foregore the pre-trip since you did a post-trip last night and obviously nothing broke while parked overnight, However, many truck co's require the driver to log a pre and post trip.
     
  8. ZVar

    ZVar Road Train Member

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    Flint, MI
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    Always fun to see thread necromancy like this. I mean ok, to be wrong is one thing. To be 100% wrong 6 months later after several threads have made the exact same point.... Just gotta shake my head.
     
  9. GasHauler

    GasHauler Master FMCSA Interpreter

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    No where I have found in FMCSR where it states you have to log a Pre-trip. They require the driver to be satisfied on certain items. We just logged 15 minutes at the beginning of a shift, "Safety check and Pre-Trip". I know it's different OTR so I would think or how I used to do it was, before I started driving after my bunk time I'd show it there. It's not hard to show. The companies like to confuse the situation and add a whole bunch on their part. That's fine just as the driver knows what is required of him or her.
     
  10. DriverKNNMGN

    DriverKNNMGN Bobtail Member

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    Jul 7, 2018
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    On duty time for all inspections you do and a pre-trip and post-trip within a 24h period .


     
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