Questions: Overhang clearances at fuel islands.

Discussion in 'Truck Stops' started by TomCougar, Nov 26, 2019.

  1. TomCougar

    TomCougar Light Load Member

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    That's good. My scale-model overhang is 19.65 feet high and my tallest truck is a double-decker cattle truck: 17' high. It was scaled by an Australian model maker. Maybe taller vehicles are permitted down under. I'd still rather live in America because we are much less anti-gun than the Aussie government is still. Hell, you can't even use a semi-auto shotgun for hunting birds down there. Don is very fond of beef. He's no rabbit for dietary habits. That's why he's very accommodating with the tall station canopy for the tall truckload of future T-bones.

    Do we Yanks even have two-level cattle trucks?

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    Last edited: Nov 27, 2019
  2. Flat Earth Trucker

    Flat Earth Trucker Road Train Member

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    It's not that truckers don't have a sense of humor, it's because cars and trucks use different fuels. You'll never hear a motorist state that he or she is going to "diesel up". Better to say trucks fuel up or take on fuel.

    That and there's a bit of animosity between motorists and truckers.

    It might do you good if you got away from your computer and actually visited a working truck stop. You might learn more about diesel itself.

    Like that its not as flammable as gasoline. Is a actually a lubricant. Causes walkways to become slippery.

    What's the difference between off road and on road diesel? Why is def used?
    And why you don't want to be parked next to a loaded bull rack.

    To answer your question of where do heavy haul tractors fuel; the tractor in question would need to find a suitable location to drop its load then head towards the nearest truck stop for fuel.
     
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  3. TomCougar

    TomCougar Light Load Member

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    Why don't they just have a fuel truck accompany the tractor on a heavy haul? Is it cheaper to consume the time and labor it takes to park the heavy-haul rig, unhook it and bobtail to and from a filling station? They could have extra large gas tanks for a heavy-haul tractor to cover the range of the entire trip. Gas up, make the haul then gas up again after the haul.

    I was a fleet truck mechanic in the army and most of my motor hole rigs were diesel. Still, the diesel fuel trucks had NO SMOKING signs upon them. I had a used 1979 diesel Oldsmobile 98 years ago, mid 1980's. Total mechanical crap.

    Still 'gas up' is a universal term to refuel any vehicle. In the film Top Gun, Goose said that he and Mav were getting low on gas in their F-14 Tomcat fighter jet. My army motor sergeant referred to the accelerator in diesel army trucks as the gas pedal still. The guy, a used car salesman, who sold me that diesel Olds said it used "diesel gasoline" in his very own words. He told me not to pump the gas pedal while starting out of carbureted car habits.

    It sounds like DEF is used to pump more money out of the trucking industry otherwise I haven't a clue what it's about. Army trucks didn't have them when I was in during the Bush senior and Clinton eras. The rented 26' moving truck I had this May was a diesel and thankfully I did not have to deal with that stupid DEF thing the whole 1,500-mile one-way journey.

    There are even some multi-fuel engines that can take both gasoline or diesel or a combination thereof. Some Mercedes cars and the army deuce n a half are some of such vehicles.
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2019
    Flat Earth Trucker Thanks this.
  4. Flat Earth Trucker

    Flat Earth Trucker Road Train Member

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    Gas up has certainly not been a term I have heard since becoming a trucker.

    While bringing a fuel truck along to fuel a heavy haul tractor does sound convenient, it isn't done due to its cost.

    One would have to employ an additional driver, pay the costs of this additional vehicle, but then, it, too, would need to stop for fuel.

    And yes, Oldsmobiles were plagued by parts that were designed to fail after a certain mileage was reached. Planned obsolescence is the technical term.
     
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  5. Rideandrepair

    Rideandrepair Road Train Member

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    It was a gas engine, I filled it with Diesel.Luckily I didn’t start it. It got towed to the shop. Late 80s Humpback Seville.
     
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