Really Big Rigs

Discussion in 'Trucks [ Eighteen Wheelers ]' started by Mr. Me, Feb 15, 2009.

  1. The_possum

    The_possum Bobtail Member

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    Sep 21, 2008
    houghton, MI
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    standard MI log truck, which would pull the above pcitured 5 axle pup trailer
    [​IMG]

    A 8 axle flowboy for hauling asphault
    [​IMG]

    The tripple ten is the gravel train setup that is still posted up above, 4 axle lead, 5 axle pup.

    a supertrain looks like this.. quad axle lead, quad axle pup..
    [​IMG]
     
    Baack Thanks this.
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  3. Mr. Me

    Mr. Me Light Load Member

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    Feb 11, 2009
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    Thanks. But this supertrain on last picture...can that trailers be pulled by single axle tractor, like the one on the picture or there must be at least 6x4(for pulling power)?
     
  4. underpsi

    underpsi Road Train Member

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    Sep 18, 2008
    Toronto, Ont
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    When I was really young my dad had a bunch of double framed western stars with 4.10's with two speed rear ends to reduce it to around 5.60's. They all had 425 mech cats with straight pipes and air starters. Always hauled brick and always heavy
     
  5. Mr. Me

    Mr. Me Light Load Member

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    Feb 11, 2009
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    Are those 2 speed rears common on michigan specials? Is that something like transfer case or something different? And what can be their ratios? Are this WS driven normally like other 5.60 when in that gear? Or they have some limits?
    Sorry for OT, by the way.
     
  6. underpsi

    underpsi Road Train Member

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    Sep 18, 2008
    Toronto, Ont
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    Sorry didn't know we were just talking about michigan trucks. These truck just ran all over Ontario Canada. The two speed unit is part of the front rear diff, its air operated. You can switch from low to high while going down the highway but only switch from high to low when completely stopped. So the whole idea of them is really startability. You can have 5.60's or whatever the ratio is to start off and have 4.10's to cruise down the highway at lower engine speed. I believe the way it works with the ratio's is it all matters what the high gear is so if there way like 3.70's in there the low side would be like 4.56's
     
  7. Mr. Me

    Mr. Me Light Load Member

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    Feb 11, 2009
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    I am sorry, we don't talk only about michigan trucks, I just assumed that you're also from Mi (I didn't look at location...). Can you put some infos about Canadians b-trains and similar (they can be little heavier then US b-trains, right?)
     
  8. Mr. Me

    Mr. Me Light Load Member

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    Feb 11, 2009
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    Anyone of you drive/had driven a turnpike doubles? Or rocky mountains double? They go up to 140k lbs right? Do you have to learn to back it up or you split the trailers first and then backing them on dock?
     
  9. The_possum

    The_possum Bobtail Member

    39
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    Sep 21, 2008
    houghton, MI
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    you could.. but you would be down one axle.. and most single screw tractors aren't tough enough for pulling trains..

    That setup is in a dealers lot, the tractor its hooked to is a yard truck.
     
  10. Mr. Me

    Mr. Me Light Load Member

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    Feb 11, 2009
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    What's the difference between B-train and super B-train?
     
  11. lostNfound

    lostNfound Road Train Member

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    A B-train is seven axles (including the tractor) and a Super-B is eight axles. The extra axle is at the rear of the front trailer, making it a tridem. Leastways, this is the definition used in western Canada.
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2009
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