rough running, about to sputter out

Discussion in 'Heavy Duty Diesel Truck Mechanics Forum' started by stonefly4, Nov 10, 2019.

  1. stonefly4

    stonefly4 Light Load Member

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    I don't know if I'll get to do that, but I believe there are drain plugs at the bottom of the tanks. Draining them and getting additives into them might do the job alright—I hope!
     
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  2. stonefly4

    stonefly4 Light Load Member

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  3. AModelCat

    AModelCat Road Train Member

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    I agree. Start fresh. Labour to have a shop clean the tanks would probably be cheaper than half a dozen of each filter plus the PITA factor of dealing with it each time it acts up.

    If its a 1993, I'd consider changing out the fuel lines while the tank's off too. Who knows what condition they are in internally.
     
  4. stonefly4

    stonefly4 Light Load Member

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    I think the first thing will be fuel line replacement. We'll take it from there. I bought the truck in 2000. It was a Penske truck. I doubt they had changed the fuel lines in 7 years. I haven't changed them. That means the fuel lines are 26 years old.

    Definitely. No matter what else. This truck is getting new fuel lines.
     
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  5. rachi

    rachi Road Train Member

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    Well thats good, you dont have all that emissions crap and you get to run paper logs. Concentrate on getting that load 20 miles to delivery and then figure out what the problem is.
     
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  6. SoCalRed

    SoCalRed Medium Load Member

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    If you have the heated fuel lines they get plugged too. Had that problem on an older truck and replaced them with regular fuel lines.
     
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  7. stonefly4

    stonefly4 Light Load Member

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    That's a 10-4.

    That's a BIG 10-4!
     
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  8. stonefly4

    stonefly4 Light Load Member

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    You know, I wonder if we're barking up the wrong tree.

    I went 650 miles before I replaced the fuel filters, after taking a load and getting back on the road. It wasn't running that bad, just a little anemic, but smooth enough, but I wondered why I had no turbo boost. I changed the filters and did notice an increase in power. The second time, this morning, was at about 850 miles, only 200 since the first filter change, and this time she was sputtering down to beat the band, just like a gel-up situation in arctic-type frigid weather.

    When I changed the filters at 650 miles, the primary was only half full when I unscrewed it and pulled it off, but when I pulled off the secondary, fuel blasted out as soon as the rubber washer was clear of the block. A lot of fuel spilled out. Yes, I had the fuel switch turned off at the outlet of the filter.

    I wonder if the return lines are clogged. Or maybe the pinhole at the back of the cylinder head is clogged...
     
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  9. lwlevens

    lwlevens Medium Load Member

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    Well I would clean out the tanks first, you don't want the new fuel lines maybe getting clogged from whatever is in the tank IF anything is in the tank.
     
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  10. stonefly4

    stonefly4 Light Load Member

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    In theory, you are correct. Logistically, in practice, I'm almost 900 miles from home. I have no idea who to turn to for a job like that.

    The main thing right now is to get this truck 20 miles up the road and get the load off the wagon. Then, I'm gonna buy more filters. Then, I'm gonna ease toward home.

    Years ago, I created easy access to the top of my transmission and the back of my cylinder head. By removing a few screws, I can lift a floor plate and easily reach the junction where the fuel lines and the return lines from each tank join up. Also, right there, is the back of the cylinder head. I'll be able to see if cracking the return line from the back of the head to the return line junction stops the engine from sputtering.

    Crap in tanks? They sat 1/3 full for 5 years.
    Clogged return lines? They're almost 30 years old.

    I'll know more soon. I'll check back in when I find out more.

    Thanks again for all the replies.
     
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