RV Transport questions...

Discussion in 'Expediter and Hot Shot Trucking Forum' started by Rick_C, Mar 12, 2012.

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  1. LGarrison

    LGarrison Road Train Member

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    May 19, 2011
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    Where do you see them looking for drivers? Are they transport companys looking for driver?
     
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  3. JChors

    JChors Medium Load Member

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    Apr 20, 2009
    Newport, OR
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    Correct. Companies looking for drivers.

    http://salem.craigslist.org/trp/4478275933.html

    I should have been more clear. Do any of the manufacturers contract with drivers who have their own authority to haul towables?
     
  4. LGarrison

    LGarrison Road Train Member

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    Yes they do
     
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  5. LGarrison

    LGarrison Road Train Member

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    This is Pinnacle Rv Transport Inc, Pay rate is $1.23 per mile to $1.30 per mile running the 11 western states. I know the rate is low for what the manufacturers are paying. I would not do it for what they offer.
     
  6. JChors

    JChors Medium Load Member

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    Has anyone used an outfit like Pinnicle to 'backhaul' one of their towables say to Denver, then DH the rest of the way to Indiana? The backhaul could pay for the trip back to Indiana (and maybe even net a few bucks). Or is that far-fetched?
     
  7. LGarrison

    LGarrison Road Train Member

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    I don't do ''backhaul'' it a term that means they will pay you less. If everyone would stand up and say I don't do them you may make more money. It cost me the same to go east as it does to go west or north or south. I hear the word ''backhaul'' red flags go up and I start looking some where else.
     
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  8. Roadmedic

    Roadmedic Road Train Member

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    I just love it when dispatch says I have a return load or backhaul. Ask the rate and they say it will help with the fuel on the deadhead back.

    Sorry, the cost of operating the truck out or back under the load is the same, so pay the same. I pass on cheaper freight.
     
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  9. JChors

    JChors Medium Load Member

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    Apr 20, 2009
    Newport, OR
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    Im looking at it from an OTR standpoint, which ive been doing the last 17 years. A backhaul in OTR doesnt necessarily mean less pay, although there are plenty of areas in the country that have cheaper rates. Sometimes you take a slightly lower paying load to get you to a higher paying area. When you average it out, it makes fiscal sense. Some guys would rather wait 3-4 days (usually far from home) to get a better-paying load out. To each his own i say.

    My understanding of RV transportation based solely on all the threads ive read here is that you usually cannot sit and wait for a backhaul because they rarely exist (on your company's board, that is) in the first place. Would it not make fiscal sense in the example set in my previous post to take a slightly lower paying load back in the direction where freight is abundant to offset any deadhead expenses? To thumb your nose up at a load and deadhead instead is akin to biting off your nose to spite your face.

    Im trying to get a better understanding of why so many RV haulers are running near 50% deadhead when there are RVs to be hauled in some other places (my example being the west coast). Is it because the RV transport companies dont have enough accounts to cover most of the country, and you can only run what they offer because you are under their operating authority? Are drivers being lulled into accepting the high deadhead as "part of the business"? It certainly seems inefficient to me.

    Which brings me back to my original premise. Why arent more drivers running under their own authority if, as you alluded to above, manufacturers will contract with them? With your own authority you eliminate the skim transport companies are taking off the top (any idea how much that is, by the way?) and you can pull a backhaul of your chosing to keep the deadhead expenses to a minimum.
     
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  10. tprice3450

    tprice3450 Bobtail Member

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    Jul 17, 2012
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    It's called trip leasing. They don't own your truck (and trailer if you own that too). If they can't load you, they have no control over what you do with your own equipment. Your only problem might be with plates. If you use theirs, you might have a problem. I've always plated my own vehicles. I want a company to have as little control over me as possible.
     
  11. Roadmedic

    Roadmedic Road Train Member

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    Trip leasing is no longer allowed. The FMCSA requires a permanent lease. My plates are in my name, but the lease is the restriction.

    In addition, the insurance on the vehicle clearly states that you must be permanently leased to the company.

    http://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/regulations/title49/section/376.12
     
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