RV Transport questions...

Discussion in 'Expediter and Hot Shot Trucking Forum' started by Rick_C, Mar 12, 2012.

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  1. bsmith0404

    bsmith0404 Bobtail Member

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    Sep 6, 2014
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    Wagners, I've been doing the math on this as well and planning to start in January. I've broken everything down a lot further in my calculations, to include the truck payment, insurance at 2500 per year, maintenance costs (oil changes etc,), a savings for breakdown repairs, tire costs, misc expenses, and fuel. For my fuel, I calculated it separately for loaded and empty. I also calculated extra miles for deadhead since I figured it won't always be an exact 50/50 split. Since I don't live at the yard, I will have extra miles getting there and back home. I also gave some room for personal use, figured this truck is my livelihood so all miles need to be figured into when I will eventually have to replace the truck. I planned a life expectancy for the truck of 500k miles with one total rebuild for engine and transmission factored into the cost. Hopefully that is all that is needed (maybe I'll get lucky and not need it at all). In the end, with current fuel prices, my costs are $1.05 per mile.

    The other part I looked at is the fact that I can drive 10 hrs per day, be on duty 14 hrs. Since most "driving time" will be interstate, I'm hoping I can average 60 mph (most driving at 65), but I've given myself some wiggle room planning for 600 miles per day. My planned driving time and miles (50,000 loaded, 60,000 deadhead) would put me on the road about 180 days per year.

    In the end I should net about $20k. That is sleeping in the truck and eating mainly out of my mini fridge and cooking on my small LP grill.

    Looks like we have calculated things just a bit differently, but have similar numbers.
     
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  3. Ellijay

    Ellijay Bobtail Member

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    Feb 16, 2014
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    Everyone's math is different, my cost per mile is not $1.05 with insurance and authority.
    But is that a net of 20k after 12 months of income from the 180 days?
     
  4. Brucesmith

    Brucesmith Heavy Load Member

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    If all you are netting is $20K a year why would you even consider this? If that 20K is after you have "paid" yourself you need a new calculator! Your math is flawed. GIGO! Have you considered the rules of HOS? You cannot drive 11 hours every day. There is a weekly limit. Then you need to reset your hours. almost impossible to average 65 mph. Your 500,000 miles is optimistic. Are you using a PU or a medium duty truck? Did you factor in back hauls? If so they are just a dream.
     
  5. LGarrison

    LGarrison Road Train Member

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    May 19, 2011
    Sandpoint Idaho
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    Here he goes again
     
    4ktejas Thanks this.
  6. Brucesmith

    Brucesmith Heavy Load Member

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  7. Brucesmith

    Brucesmith Heavy Load Member

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    Try comparing rv hauling to getting a job as a company driver. If you do the research you can get more than 45 cents a mile plus some bonuses. That would net you over $45,000 a year with no risks. Lots of carriers looking for part time drivers as well.
     
  8. LGarrison

    LGarrison Road Train Member

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    May 19, 2011
    Sandpoint Idaho
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    What the rate you will be paid?
     
  9. bsmith0404

    bsmith0404 Bobtail Member

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    Sep 6, 2014
    Las Cruces, NM
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    Well it looks like I reinvigorated this thread. To answer a couple questions, I have a 3500 DRW Duramax, the 500K miles I am planning includes an engine and tranny replacement. Some say you won't get that out of one even with one replacement, others say you'll get 500k on the original. Only time will tell.

    I know you have to do a weekly reset on the clock that includes at least 2 nights from 1-5. The 180 days of driving is not consecutive. I don't see why I wouldn't get 11 hours of driving most days, when I can have 14 on the clock. Would love to hear more on that.

    The $20K per year is based on $1.50 per mile (some units pay more, others are less so this is an average). The main reason for wanting to do this is, again, I am retired. This just gives me some extra income, but allows me to choose when I drive and when I have me/family time. I am not punching a clock for anyone and will not be told I can't take time off because I don't have vacation days available. For me RV transporting fits the need and the desire. I don't need to make $45k a year and have no desire to.......well I wouldn't mind if I could do it when I want and go where I want, but don't see to many employers willing to hire someone under those conditions. Even some transport companies don't work that way, so I have sorted through those.

    I appreciate everyone's input. Please don't get me wrong, just because I don't seem t agree with you, don't think I'm ignoring you. My situation is different and I am considering all information I receive to see if it applies to me. I only ask that if you disagree with me, please explain why so I can understand/learn from someone with experience.
     
  10. Brucesmith

    Brucesmith Heavy Load Member

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    I understand your logic but I would be concerned about excessive repair bills. I ran into an American RV hauler while in Calgary. He was retired and actually did quite well. BUT he was hauling from a border town in Montana to the Canadian west. This company used some type of flatbeds to get the Indiana units to Montana where they had a large yard. His runs were short and he could get in lots of miles. BUT he was in Calgary as his truck broke down in Montana. He lived in MN and this was the cheapest way home for him. The truck was a Dodge still under warranty and needed a new dif and driveshaft(s). I don't remember the value of the repairs but it was huge. Parts were a week away and he felt it was better to return home than stay in Motels. You will be surprised at the things that will wear out on a vehicle with high miles. After about 300,000 they get unreliable and will always break down when it is inconvenient. Down time hurts. As I have stated before if you got something for the empty miles it might be a good job. There is a reason why there is so much turnover in this segment of truck driving. Sleeping in the back seat of a truck gets lame after awhile. Eating truck stop food can kill you. Hard to eat sandwiches from a cooler every day. In a snow storm you will use up your 14 before getting any miles. Remember you must take a half hour break every 8 hours. That counts against your 14. So does your pretrip and post trip( 15 minutes each). You reset cannot be done at just anytime . Only once in 7 days and not before the 7 th day. I might not have explained that correctly but it screws up your travel plans. 36 hours in a truck stop is like being in prison! If the same rules apply to RV haulers you cannot drive after your 14. Even to go for lunch somewhere. When on your reset you also cannot drive.
     
  11. bsmith0404

    bsmith0404 Bobtail Member

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    Sep 6, 2014
    Las Cruces, NM
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    Thanks for the info. I plan to do my reset at home. I understand there may not always be a load going exactly where I need it and that will eat into profits, just have to play it by ear.

    I'm hoping I can get the loaded miles in during the busy season (Jan-Jun) and do limited runs the rest of the year. I used to work as a mechanic, so I will use the down season to go through the truck doing some preventative maintenance in hopes of getting through the busy season with few problems. I know that doesn't always work out, but having down time to give everything a good look through should help limit problems that others experience......but, as you said, they never break when at home in the driveway. Just have to take care of everything the best I can and hope for the best like the others do. I've done my share of parking lot repairs, they suck, but n the end you're thankful if the problem you have can be repaired in a parking lot.

    As for sleeping in a truck and eating on the road...I know it's not ideal, but it can't be any worse than sleeping on a mattress in Afghanistan that you can feel every spring/coil in. Heck I even stacked two on top of each other thinking it would help....I felt every spring and coil in each of them. If I can fall asleep wearing body armor with rockets being launched at you, a bed in the backseat area of the truck at a truck stop or wayside is like a 5 star hotel (I could be wrong). As for food, it's not bad when deployed, but you get tired of the same thing all the time with no options. Most people have no idea what it is like to not even have the option to go to McDonalds just for something different. I plan to take my camp stove/grill along and cook out. You can eat steak everyday if you buy it at the grocery store and cook it yourself for $5, not that I plan on that.....I like beef stew with bread and butter :)

    I am a bit worried about the weather. This past year really sucked and I can only imagine what you all went through. I'm originally from northern Wisconsin, so I've dealt with weather before. That doesn't mean I like it or am any better at dealing with it, just means I understand what havoc it can play. I will just have to deal with it the best I can like everyone else and figure on slowing down, which obviously eats into profit.

    Thanks again for your response.
     
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