Tankers the Schneider way

Discussion in 'Tanker, Bulk and Dump Trucking Forum' started by Tardis, Dec 8, 2011.

  1. RickG

    RickG Road Train Member

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    Then you sure wouldn't want them in a side compartment under the bunk . If they are that bad they should be trashed . Reactions with chemicals contacted on the next load could be interesting .
     
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  3. Tardis

    Tardis Light Load Member

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    The duffel goes into the side compartment too. All the contaminated gear stays together in the duffel. I imagine if the rubber boots are bad you wouldn't put them in the duffle but let them sit alone in the compartment. I didn't suggest that other tanker drivers didn't shave but most drivers (vans, flats and reefers) don't need to wear a respirator and seem to sport facial hair and or stubble more often than not.

    Schneider has a variety of tanks of many ages. The tanks themselves don't wear out and Schneider keeps the rest of the trailer in good repair. Some of the newer tanks may have pressure gauges at ground level but that only eliminates one climb. The tanks we trained with in Gary were old and out of service.

    As to checking for heel, not all loads are water thin. A thicker product can skin to the sides and all loads need to be checked for heel regardless. Anything over 5 gallons remaining needs to be reported before you leave the customer.

    The newest tanks are intermodal. This is a big prospect for Schneider right now. Schneider decided to get out of fuel hauling in order to concentrate on growing their intermodal presence. We got to see some intermodal equipment along with aluminum and lined (plastite and rubber) tanks. There are still some configuration changes happening to the intermodals to keep the tank outlet out of the driver's face.

    And I never mentioned heat in transit. You really can't heat a product with engine coolant but you can slow down cooling once the product cools to below 180 degrees. You need to stop at a tankwash for steam if the product needs to be warmer than that.:biggrin_25519:
     
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  4. RickG

    RickG Road Train Member

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    Now that intermodal is interesting . Are those the tanks that have heavy metal frames around them and go on container chassis ? If not I shudder to think of the damage the unloaders would do at railyards . I used to run steady for a trailer repair yard in GA going to CSX and NS yards picking up damaged trailers belonging to Xtra and TransAmerica . I'd bring them to the shop for repair then we'd deliver them to UPS , Yellow or CF (yup , Cornflake - it's been a while )
     
  5. Johnny99

    Johnny99 Johnny be Good

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    A cheap plastic tool box from the dollar store and some bungee cords to secure it behind the cab. I got some type of Maleate on my gloves one time, and didn't realize it because this stuff was odorless. 30 minutes down the road I had to pull off, was dizzy and getting double vision. The gloves were in the side box, not in the cab. After my head cleared I stuck the gloves in a hose tube.
     
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  6. pathfinder1361

    pathfinder1361 Light Load Member

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    exactly...i believe with some products, even a tiny amount, even the side box will fairly quickly be noticeable inside the cab. MA=methyl acrylate
    peee uuuuu!
     
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  7. Johnny99

    Johnny99 Johnny be Good

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    Yeah, Acrylate. You could always tell at the tank wash when someone had hauled acrylate. You could smell it for blocks.
     
  8. GasHauler

    GasHauler Master FMCSA Interpreter

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    You see the guys with experience talk about the product along with the truck. That's where the training comes in. If you want to know where the requirements for any load that deals with hazmat I suggest reading the CFR 49 Parts 100 to Parts 177 Subpart A §177.800 to §177.870 depending of course what you're hauling. I would especially pay attention to §177.816 Driver Training. And Rick is right, just because one person that holds a responsible position is to lazy or not even in the know himself does not make it law. It's what is written and like many say it's written from blood.
     
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  9. mustang190

    mustang190 Road Train Member

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    All of our trailers have the pump mounted between the landing gear. The tractor has a hyd. pump mounted on the side of the frame which runs off the engine, hit a switch in the cab and the rpm kicks up to 900 and engages the hyd. system. And the hyd. hoses go to a pto motor at the rear of the frame. You connect a slip shaft to the PTO motor shaft and to the pump shaft and there is a contro; handle at the Hyd. unit to control the shaft speed.
    All trailers that are not belly unloaders have a belly line from the rear of the tank to the pump.
    Plus we have high pressure air for a air-off if it's a non-haxmat.
     
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  10. mustang190

    mustang190 Road Train Member

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    May as well just say it,
    The company I work for lost a couple of contracts to schneider, they came in and under bid way low. Now we pick up a lot of loads that schneider is either late on or cannot handle. When we get a load the driver is there at the load and at the delivery! The only exceptions are if a local driver loads it or there is a personal emergency. When a local driver loads and brings it back to the yard the OTR driver is usually there waiting to run with it. No dropping terminal to terminal. You will be surprised of all the late loads Schneider has that we(and others) grab.(and trust me, I'm sure our co. charges out the #####!)
     
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  11. Johnny99

    Johnny99 Johnny be Good

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    When I was tanking very seldom did we do drop & hooks at customers. We loaded it, transported it, unloaded it and then went to the tank wash. Sometimes we got to swap a dirty trailer for a clean one. Occasionally a terminal would have a load ready for you to pick up on their yard, or you would get to drop a load at a terminal if they had a hot load ready to go and the one you were under wasn't due to deliver yet. The only time we got to unload and deadhead home was if it was a dedicated trailer. Usually that was only with dry bulk, or some particularly nasty liquid that required a dedicated trailer such as acid.
     
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