tractor- box truck conversion

Discussion in 'Expediter and Hot Shot Trucking Forum' started by The Challenger, Nov 28, 2008.

  1. RickG

    RickG Road Train Member

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    It says the ORIGINAL record to the carrier . You keep the driver copy . Canada requires you to show the past 14 days .
     
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  3. otr500

    otr500 Light Load Member

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    So why are we now "nitpicking"? You asked to be enlightened so I did. I am sure that is why DOT has gotten serious about any "2 week rule". Where I live that is 14 days or one day late.
    There are postings from drivers on here that mention having to turn logs in every trip. Some companies require this but many do not. Some drivers hear things and with out any thought believe it as gospel.
    I was not "nitpicking" but simply replying to your post concerning the law that I must assume you were not familiar with or mistaken about. You asked, I answered, thank you is sufficient.



     
  4. otr500

    otr500 Light Load Member

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    Thank you.
    I did not know this. I ran Canada but under US rules. I guess when posting we need to differentiate between Canada and the U.S. right?
    Of course a driver from Canada will not be subjected to the U.S. rules concerning paper work and the same with a driver from the U.S. in Canada. There are rules between the two countries that can get a driver in trouble.
    There are factions in the U.S. that, even though statistics concerning big trucks are safer every year, try to force rules on us that make no sense. There are some organizations that have an agenda, and do not even care if a roll of toilet paper cost $10.00, but want trucking to end. Does anyone think it fair that such an organization be allowed to have input on trucking policies?

    Someone that is familiar with the different U.S and Canadian laws should list some that are important.


     
  5. otr500

    otr500 Light Load Member

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    I have not looked but I did ask where you were from. Would it not have been easier to post this?


     
  6. RickG

    RickG Road Train Member

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    Owensboro , KY
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    Here's the link to Canadian HOS http://www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/trucks/regulations/hours.shtml .
    The terminology is confusing because they refer to the carrier as "operator" . The operator can put a driver on a 14 day cycle which requires 24 hours off every 14 days . That is why they require you to carry copies of logs for the past 14 days .
     
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  7. lostNfound

    lostNfound Road Train Member

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    Close. The two cycles here are 70/7 and 120/14. On 70/7 it is similar to the U.S. 70/8 except we can drive 13 hours in 14 (or drive 15 hours north of 60*). After 70 hours you must take a 36-hour reset. You do not recoup hours as you do in the U.S.

    If on 120/14 you must take 24 hours consecutive off no later than 70, and the reset is 72 hours. To switch from cycle 1 to 2 requires 36 hours off, and to switch from 2 to 1 requires 72 hours off.

    As mentioned you must have your last 14-days logs. And, of course, a U.S. driver is subject to Canadian rules when up here just the same as Canadian drivers are subject to U.S. rules when down there.
     
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  8. RTO Speedwagon

    RTO Speedwagon Bobtail Member

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    Jan 26, 2009
    Ontheroad, Again
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    I thought about doing this, I was quoted 18000$. You could probably find a good used expediter already set up by the time you paid and waited 3 weeks for the conversion.:biggrin_25526:
     
  9. otr500

    otr500 Light Load Member

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    Why would anyone want to convert from a 13 speed to a 9 speed? Especially if the 13 was a double over. There is still the macho thing about owning an auto shift or automatic verses a standard. I have driven most types of transmissions. I currently drive a large car Pete with an 18 speed and 550 horses. It is a power house that gets 5.5 mpg and runs whatever speed wanted.
    I drove a box van with a 6 speed automatic that I loved. The 300hp and wide open speed was great. It got 10.3 MPG. With todays prices this is fantastic.
    With todays economy it is not cost effective to convert verses buying. The exception would be if a person already owned a box van and a big truck.
    The truck has to be lenghtened, the van installed, the transmissioned replaced(to convert), and if you are not doing the work someone will get paid.
    A lower mileage box van can be purchased at a fair price. You will need as low a price as possible to be able to afford to sit waiting for freight.
    If you own a big truck you can find out for yourself. Look in the equipment books at truck stops and price a conversion then compare to the prices of good used box vans.


     
  10. BlueHawk

    BlueHawk Bobtail Member

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    I'm considering doing this also. I figure around $5000 for a box, and around $10,000 for a stretch/mount. Looking at tractors today, you could find one with 500,000 miles or so for $15,000-20,000.

    Not a bad way to go, IMO. I've seen straight-8s where there are 600k-800k miles, and they want buku bux ($30,000 or more). This way, at least, you're getting new wiring and a fresh stretch job. Not to mention, you get what you want in a cab/box combo.
     
  11. HwyPilot

    HwyPilot Medium Load Member

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    I did some research on the straight-8 expeditor truck conversion a few years ago (before fuel prices took flight and the economy went the opposite) and was told that the best to have is a refer box, undermount refer unit, on a Class 8 chassis. With this setup you can haul about anything that fits in the space and weight limits.

    Jack legs aren't required if you have tandem drives, but a forward lift axle (instead)may be a good idea for light loads, deadheading and mpg.

    An undermount liftgate depends on choice, as they weigh about a thousand pounds properly equipped. A railgate (or chain lift gate) gets in the way when docking, so those are usually not the way to go (and I don't know if they support a forklift when dropped flat).

    An automatic makes sense to some (no doubt in traffic), but they are expensive, heavy, and more work (and parts) to repair and maintain. A 3 pedal A/T still has a clutch to mess with, so no benefit there, and if you have to shift on inclines manually - all you've done is changed the type of shifting. To me, a manual will always give the driver a better means to control the truck - and they cost and weigh less. Some trucks come equipped with a hydraulic clutch, or can be setup with one, to make the clutch pedal tons lighter and easier on your leg.

    This is the 2 cents worth I gained from talking with expeditors and truck builders, comments are always welcomed.
     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2009
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