Truck Load Rates Halt 8 Week Slide 2.0

Discussion in 'Freight Broker Forum' started by Scooter Jones, Mar 7, 2020.

  1. REO6205

    REO6205 Trucker Forum STAFF Staff Member

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    Not all the farmers are getting all the water they want. The big corporations are, of course, but the small landowner is struggling with allocations. It's always been that way.
    Right now my water district has us on a 25% reduction in our total ditch water allowance and we're lucky it's not more. That means the guy that leases my rice ground planted 20 % less rice this year and used my own wells to pick up the slack. My wells are PG&E metered and it's expensive to use for the volume needed for rice,.
    My water allocation for almonds is down 30% but I use a low volume drip irrigation that is a lot more efficient than flooding or sprinklers. The drip system went in last year and if the prices stay up I should see a net decrease in my water costs in about four more years.

    Here's a shot of Lake Oroville. Most of my ditch water comes from there. Or used to, anyway. When the lake is full the water is up to the tree line.


    [​IMG]
     
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  3. 86scotty

    86scotty Road Train Member

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    Whoa, that's sad. Haven't seen that lake but I was at Hoover Dam a couple weeks ago. I generally stop and look there every year or two. It looks bad.
     
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  4. 86scotty

    86scotty Road Train Member

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    I don't understand why some of the overage of water in the east can't be diverted to the west. Sure, it would be expensive to truck it but why not haul it on trains. The network is there, the government is paying for the problem which is going to trickle down to us no matter how we handle it. Seems like a lateral move to me. WAYYY more snow and rain in the east than we can deal with.
     
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  5. p608

    p608 Road Train Member

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    Don't #### with mother nature, she will kick you ### every time.
     
  6. SteveScott

    SteveScott Road Train Member

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    Yeah, I realize the family owned farms are getting hit hard by the drought. I drive the northern central valley every week and I can see how many fewer rice fields were planted this year compared to last.

    Horrible picture of Lake Oroville. Lake Shasta looks just the same and they're still releasing water from the dam to protect the salmon run which I feel they shouldn't. Salmon will remain in the ocean for additional years if they can't get to their spawning grounds because of drought conditions. Long before humans were around, they did just fine in dry years or decades, and somehow managed to survive without our intervention. Now the Native Americans and commercial fisherman go into a panic when there is a slow year for salmon and demand federal help.

    It's going to get really interesting when they shut down the hydroelectric turbines on Oroville and Shasta in the coming weeks. We're already barely keeping the lights on, and those two dams produce a lot of power for the state. I'm ready to get the heck out of here.
     
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  7. 86scotty

    86scotty Road Train Member

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    So don't fight forest fires?

    I get what you're saying, generally, but some stuff requires human intervention.
     
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  8. ProfessionalNoticer

    ProfessionalNoticer Medium Load Member

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    Bad example as most forest fires are started by man.
     
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  9. Midwest Trucker

    Midwest Trucker Road Train Member

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    Sounds like a real #### show out there.

    Far as rates I ended up ####ing myself too Joe. Lost a $1200 backhaul late in the day Friday. But, getting my guy home is what I promise and that’s what we do.

    Reciever took forever because the broker didn’t make an appointment. Therefore, the next load couldn’t be gotten in time. Gotta love brokers and crappy shippers/receivers. :)
     
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  10. p608

    p608 Road Train Member

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    Only as far as humans are concerned. no need to fight a fire except to save homes that maybe should or shouldn't have been built. I have a hard time giving a #### about a multinational company pumping water into the desert so they can grow vegetables to sell out of the country, or damming off a body of water so you can ride your jet ski. Now because it's all ####ed up you want the rest of the country to bail you out. humans brought this on themselves
     
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  11. SteveScott

    SteveScott Road Train Member

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    Having lived in California for the last 40+ years and being evacuated twice in the last 5 years, fires have always been a way of life out here. The biggest and deadliest fires we have out here are mostly started by either power lines touching trees in remote areas, or lightning which is usually what starts fires in the mountains. The wine country fires over the last 5 years (which is where I live) were started by the power company. People keep building homes in more remote areas, so fires destroy more homes and kill more people than they did just 30 years ago. The Camp fire which destroyed the town of Paradise 2 years ago was started by a power line and killed over 100 people.

    The Native Americans that were here before Europeans arrived knew the importance of fire mitigation, and did controlled burns every year. When the first Spanish explorers arrived in 1542, their name for what is now San Pedro Harbor was Baya de los Fumos with means Bay of Smoke. There were wildfires burning along the coast when they first laid eyes on California. The ancient redwood trees some of which are over 2,000 years old show scars of dozens of fires over their life span. It's been going on forever, but now every time there is a new fire they blame it on global warming.
     
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