Turbo Wing's Effect On Milage?

Discussion in 'Trucks [ Eighteen Wheelers ]' started by Disturbed Canuck, Apr 10, 2009.

  1. oneshot

    oneshot Medium Load Member

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    It was the smaller wing because of my standup sleeper.
     
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  3. oneshot

    oneshot Medium Load Member

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    I wanted the fuel savings. That's why I stay to the right and run 65 or a little slower.No rush,most of my lds go terminal to terminal.The fact that it looks good is a perk.HaHa:biggrin_25525:
     
  4. starcommander

    starcommander Light Load Member

    Well that splains the difference in price. I had more stainless to pay for.:biggrin_25525:
     
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  5. oneshot

    oneshot Medium Load Member

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    I understand it's been a few yrs but now it only cost $100 more for the wing for a flat top sleeper.:biggrin_255:
     
  6. droy

    droy Heavy Load Member

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    Read an article in HDT sometime back that addressed things like the fairings, air dams, etc. According to them, one of the most detrimental factors to fuel mileage was the distance from back of cab to the trailer nose. Wind tunnel tests showed the best result was an unrealistic distance of 11", and results got progressively worse until a distance of 36" (iirc). Greater distance than 36" caused the results to take a giant leap the wrong way, almost negating the gain of a rooftop spoiler.
     
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  7. Red Fox

    Red Fox Road Train Member

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    This somewhat countermands the studies done on the pickup gates. It was determined that lowering the gate did nothing to assist in FE on a pickup, although removing it (for weight) would help somewhat.
    Evidently the air curling around the back of a semi is acting differently than the air behind a pickup.
     
  8. Big Don

    Big Don "Old Fart"

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    I believe the difference is the AMOUNT of drag created. Now on my Power Stroke, removing the tail gate made no difference whatsoever. However on my dually, with the big gas engine, (unfortunately) in it, it made a difference of a little over a mile a gallon. Considering that this gas hog averages 11 MPG on the hwy. . .:biggrin_25516:
     
  9. oneshot

    oneshot Medium Load Member

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    As u probably know Droy wind tunnel test are good for information but when your out on the road in real road situations like side wind,terrain,driving habits and other things. I like to hear from the exp driver who can give u good old pencil and paper figures on how a product has hurt or helped him.You know how alot of these test work,they know what answer they want so they run the test in a way to get to the answer.:biggrin_25525:
     
  10. Red Fox

    Red Fox Road Train Member

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    Good call. As I study a lot on FE devices and am engaged in research on hydrogen gas and other fuel additives, we find a lot of disparity due to external influences like tire pressure, open windows, etc.
    OTOH, a truck that goes enormous distances on tanks of fuel will be a much more accurate indicator, the distances tending to negate any small variables.
    I hate it when John Q. puts a device on his car, drives to work and back, refills and claims 40% better FE...when all it was is the fuelup was done at a different pump, and the car was tilted another direction, allowing 1/2 gallon more to be filled.
     
    Big Don Thanks this.
  11. droy

    droy Heavy Load Member

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    Very true, and I honestly can't remember if they simulated actual driving conditions or just a straight head on type of wind test.
    If I had to guess, I'd say they tried to duplicate road conditions, as Heavy Duty Trucking has been a great mag to get good information from, imho. This was done not to tout some advertiser's product, but to give truck owners ideas on how to set-up their equipment for fuel economy, utilizing things such as air dams, spoilers,etc.
    You probably have seen the full length fairings that a lot of trailers are now being equipped with, to block the air drag generated under a trailer- that was one option they highly recommended, supposedly getting excellent results.

    All in all, to me a realistic comparison would be two identical rigs following one another, one equipped with, and the other without.
     
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