What type of trailer for hot shot?

Discussion in 'Expediter and Hot Shot Trucking Forum' started by Menchaca0807, Sep 12, 2017.

  1. Menchaca0807

    Menchaca0807 Bobtail Member

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    I'm wondering what is the best type of trailer for hot shot

    Here are my questions
    1. What should the GVWR be ?
    2. Is steel or aluminium better ?
    3. What's better slide in ramps or these mega ramps ?

    If you have any other comments as to items better on the trailer or items you don't want to pay extra for please let me know

    Thank you
     
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  3. x1Heavy

    x1Heavy Road Train Member

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    Steel is somewhat heavier than aluminum and might cost you ability to haul something heavy because of total GVWR.

    I preferred aluminum Ravens over the fountaine Steel covered wagons in my time with 18 wheelers. The problem with the aluminum is the mental detail you must always remember the math on every foot of that decking. The aluminum could bridge 52000 pound coils on 24 feet and it has to be within 1 inch of center point where the frames were the strongest.

    The fontaine could do it too, if you ran with 1/4 tanks and had no scales around to worry about, being about a thousand or two over weight gross.

    Ramps? Well, I reach deep into my paving dump days and I can tell you this question.. how strong are you? I used to be around 135 at one point and Im lifting each side of the tracked ramps on the back of the trailer that weighed just as much as I did over my head to flip em on while doing the loading or unloading routine.

    I would absolutely snap my spine doing that now at my age. Something to consider.

    Im sorry my answers are not true to hotshots, but it's the only way I can help you understand a little more using some of my work with the bigger brethern as a example.
     
  4. Mikesee

    Mikesee Light Load Member

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    Any ideas about what you will be hauling? What is a your tow vehicle?
     
  5. luckystar

    luckystar Light Load Member

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    I'm not sure anybody could really answer your question. You need to supply more details. What is your business? What will you be hauling? What weights are you licensed for? What is your power unit?

    Trucks and trailers are just tools you'll need the correct one for the job you'll be doing
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2017
  6. Menchaca0807

    Menchaca0807 Bobtail Member

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    It's hauling general freight and it's just hotshot not sure about liscense and f350 dually diesel
     
  7. BigBob410

    BigBob410 Road Train Member

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    You don't know what license you have? It seems to me...and I'm not trying to be mean...you have a lot of research to do before you worry about dishing out a bunch of cash for a trailer. We wouldn't want you to get "impounded in Cleveland" for doing it wrong!!
     
  8. Mikesee

    Mikesee Light Load Member

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    If the GVWR of your truck is 12,500 the GVWR of your trailer will need to be less than 13,501 if you do not have a CDL. If you have a CDL or are going to get one, look for higher weight trailers
     
  9. flatbedcarrier

    flatbedcarrier Medium Load Member

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    Will you be running a class A license? We do, and our trailer gvw is 24,900. We run 3500, 4500, and 5500 series dual rear wheel trucks.

    Personally I like a steel trailer with a wood deck. Trailers can easily get damaged and finding someone that can weld steel is easier than finding someone thats good at welding aluminum. At least that's been my exoerience with making repairs away from home. I weld, and I've fixed major damage on our trailers.

    I like a trailer that gives me many types of load options. I run trailers here at my business that I can move many different types of freight on. Having a versatile trailer makes a big difference.

    And as far as ramps, I've never been a fan of flip over ramps because I've seen them get in the way of some of the stuff we haul. For instance, we move a lot of new construction trucks that either end up flush with the rear of our trailer, and in most cases they overhang the rear of our trailer. Once those trucks are loaded on the trailer we couldnt flip them back up because the truck on the rear is in the way.

    This is the style trailer we run. At times we will use a 35/5 trailer but only if the flip over ramps have been replaced with 8' detachable ramps with a hook lip.
     
  10. samcperez

    samcperez Light Load Member

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    Are 40ft trailers with crew cab dually trucks over 65Ft?Does this ever cause issues with the DOT guys?
     
  11. flatbedcarrier

    flatbedcarrier Medium Load Member

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    Depends on the truck and trailer. In 2010 new crew cab long beds got a little longer because they made the back seat area larger. At that time we started having the manufacturer build our trailers with a shorter neck to keep us under 65'. Whatever trailer you're thinking about buying ask the person, or dealership to measure it from the center of the king pin, or gooseneck coupler to the rear of the trailer. Then you measure the truck from the fifth wheel hole, or center of the gooseneck ball to the front of your truck. Add those two measurements together to be sure you're not over 65' before purchasing the trailer.

    You'll find a lot of of pre 2011 gooseneck style trailers will have a 8' neck. In 2010 most trailer manufacturers didn't want to build their trailers with shorter necks. Basically because they didn't want to change their jig table for building these necks . I think I was the only one that caught the problem back then and I immediately started letting everyone know. At first the manufacturer that we were buying all our trailers from only wanted to shorten the deck length. That wasn't going to fly. As soon as they started seeing a decline in sales for 40' trailers they changed their minds about building a 6" shorter neck.

    For those of you out their looking to buy used trailers, also check the measurement from the center of king pin. or gooseneck couple to the center of the rear axle. It needs to be under 40' in length.
     
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