What's it like transporting heavy equipment?

Discussion in 'Flatbed Trucking Forum' started by I love tequila, May 17, 2020.

  1. I love tequila

    I love tequila Light Load Member

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    Is there precautions you have to take when hauling heavy equipment? Are the trucks more powerful than most other types of hauling? Can it be local or is it mainly regional and over the road?
     
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  3. "semi" retired

    "semi" retired Road Train Member

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    I hauled heavy equipment ( not oversize) and I really liked it. Those jobs are highly sought after, or they were. It's probably the most intense form of trucking. Lots to be aware of, that you'll never encounter with a box. When I did it, there was no special motor, just took my time. Today, they usually have like 600 hp Cats because some of the stuff is really heavy. Turns, braking, height, all have to be watched. Best thing, pull the chains, fire up the machine, and you are unloaded in 15 seconds, and the guys are usually waiting for you, so no problem there. I'd say most oversize is local, but stuff like skid steers or tractors could be long haul. If you can find a job like that, go for it.
     
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  4. shawnhhllc

    shawnhhllc Light Load Member

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    I just recently switched over from being a local O/O tanker fuel man to heavy haul. I don’t do much “heavy” stuff yet but I’ve gotten my share of OS loads. You just have to use common sense when securing and know the laws. Acceleration /deceleration (chains in opposite directions) I don’t drive any different. I do the posted speed limits when I feel safe to do so and follow the exit ramps speed. I won’t back into a sharp turn on a slope with a OS/OW hoe. I saw someone do it and it was about to dump. If I’m OS/OW I’ll have to my best at finding parking. You’ll see a lot of HH just make their own places which is understandable. Especially if they have a Jeep It took me a bit to get used to the side to side movement vs the pushing and pulling movement in my tanker. Equipment is rewarding to me. I left the tanker world because I wanted to work my way up to bigger and larger loads

    trucks are basically the same at my current company. Others out there are turned up 565 and 605 Cummins and your older big kitty cats are still around
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2020
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  5. REO6205

    REO6205 Trucker Forum STAFF Staff Member

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    @I love tequila ...It looks like you're really doing your homework and finding all about different types of trucking.
    Have you made any progress toward getting your CDL yet?
     
  6. MACK E-6

    MACK E-6 Moderator Staff Member

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    I’ve done it on a local basis.

    A basic knowledge of physics and common sense will serve you well, but you’ll also need to learn a lot on the job.
     
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  7. I love tequila

    I love tequila Light Load Member

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    Not yet... making sure that I get enough research done on job descriptions and companies that I am interested in...
     
  8. "semi" retired

    "semi" retired Road Train Member

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    Dang, why didn't I think of that?:happy3:
     
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  9. TripleSix

    TripleSix God of Roads

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    A5045741-82C5-4ED5-9A2A-F433A66D89C6.jpeg You didn’t mention OFF-ROAD. There is a reason why many of your entry level box companies supply rookies with detuned, low hp trucks...to help prevent rookies from grenading the drivetrain. If you are running heavy equipment, you will see your fair share of mud. The more powerful the engine, the easier it is to grenade the drivetrain. And so, you have to learn to be gentle with the truck, especially on the throttle. No revving and dumping the clutch and making the chassis twist. No pedal to the metal while accelerating.

    I ran local for a construction, demolition company. So yes, you can do local. Don’t allow running local to develop bad habits. The company I drove for got busted when their driver had an escavator walk off of an 8 axle rig in the middle of a turn in the city. No securement and a class B driver.

    One more thing... you have to be able to load your wagon yourself. It’s not always easy. Some machines are so big and tall that when trying to line up to get on the trailer, you lose sight of the trailer 20 ft before you even touch the trailer. EE91E54A-CCD3-4C76-8B3A-FC7D7E174D00.jpeg
     
  10. shawnhhllc

    shawnhhllc Light Load Member

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    take that advice above. I forgot about loading and unloading. A lot of times your by yourself or maybe some else is there splitting trailers with you. Ask for help. Just say excuse me. I’m new to this and not quite sure. They will take their time and help you. It takes five min to help someone. To say oh no chain here here and here.

    example of bad driving would be stopped at a red light loaded heavy having to go uphill. Drive shafts will just snap and things will get tore up. Like I said earlier I don’t get in a hurry. I try my best to do it right the first time. I’m very methodical and follow my process or steps. And do a walk around then walk around it again from the other direction. I messed up the other day and had a simple track loader 3 of my four chains was pulling to the rear. Posted my pic on here and a fella caught it. Saved my day because I fixed it right away. Glad it got caught because I got to Florida and got the right lane red X. Can’t thank this group enough.
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2020
  11. Gliding ProStar

    Gliding ProStar Light Load Member

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    As the other posters have stated, hauling heavy equipment, agricultural equipment and construction equipment is a totally different world. Common sense will be your best guide and enough securement equipment like chains, binders and straps to apply that common sense.

    Loading and unloading can be difficult when you are by yourself. You can't always see the trailer and sometimes you can't see the ground to get a bearing on your situation. Ask for help. There is no shame in getting loaded securely and successfully with a helper. I ask for help when I need it. Period.

    When loaded and driving, take your time. Understand your load and it's characteristics. Know what your load will do when you turn fast/sharp or when you hit the brakes in an emergency. Our center of gravity can get high up there and it can cause the trailer to lean and sway when tested.

    Also, as a recommendation to any flatbedder or open deck puller, just because you can legally haul a piece of equipment with 4 chains does not mean that you should. Use those extra chains to secure your load. A load delivered and signed for is a paid load and money in your pocket. A load laying sideways on the pavement is your deductible going out the window.

    Also, this is a great place for information and advice. I'm proud of you for asking questions and doing your research. You already have a step ahead of the next guy/gal. Good luck in your future endeavors. Trucking can be very rewarding.
     
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