Whats the advantage/differnce of split axle trailers vs tandom axle trailers?

Discussion in 'Questions From New Drivers' started by Bazerk Wizz Bang!, Nov 30, 2010.

  1. Bazerk Wizz Bang!

    Bazerk Wizz Bang! Medium Load Member

    Saw a shiny chrome trailer, chrome top to bottem even chrome reefer with split axle's at walmart being towed by a nicely decked out truck awhile ago. I saw the trucker inside and asked him about why he went with a split axle no reall reason, just curios. His response was something like: "Man becouse it like totality looks so much cooler than those other trailers man" ask him what the difference was, same basic response "I dont know but it looks cool man" something like that.

    Got me wondering though. I see all flatbeds have split axle's, a lot of the moving vans have them, but most of the dry vans run sliding tandoms, and almost all reefer use sliding tandoms. Why dont flatbeds use sliding tandoms, or visa-versa. With sliding tandoms you can easily adjust your weight, why would some one want there axles to be fixed? On the split axle trailers can you slide one axle or another or are they fixed?
     
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  3. bulldozerbert

    bulldozerbert Medium Load Member

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    do you think it has to do with weight? and state regulations??

    there is a discussion on here "somewhere" about it. one of those guys will post actual facts.

    I think if I remember correctly, they can put 40,000 pounds on the spread axle.
     
  4. Flying Dutchman

    Flying Dutchman Road Train Member

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    tandems are good for 34k lbs, separate axles are good for 20k each
     
  5. Flying Dutchman is right. Because the axles are 10"2" apart they are considered single axles and you can run 20k on each. When you're hauling 48,000 single coils and such you don't have to be precise on the placement of the coil, the spread axle configuration is very forgiving!!! Plus they ride nice.
     
  6. ChromeDome

    ChromeDome Road Train Member

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    Also, the spread axle reefers that you see are mostly 48 foot trailers. So they are a little shorter. Goes well with a long wheelbase truck, especially if you have a dump on the back axle. You can back that trailer into any hole without much problem, once you have a little practice.
     
  7. Kenworth_Trucker

    Kenworth_Trucker Bobtail Member

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    I have always preferred them , but thats me.
     
  8. Skunk_Truck_2590

    Skunk_Truck_2590 Road Train Member

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    Might ride better and help with weight but backing into a hole is a bigger pain in the ### and they eat up tires too!
     
  9. Jack Smithton

    Jack Smithton Light Load Member

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    What about the California 40-foot kingpin-to-center-of-rear axle rule? How does that work? I asked some driver in Arizona, and all he could tell me was "I don't run in California" (A pretty good idea).
     
  10. Skunk_Truck_2590

    Skunk_Truck_2590 Road Train Member

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    I refuse load's going anywhere in Cali, Boston, or NYC (unless passing through on I-95) or Canada. Other than that I'll go anywhere. I'm not sure about the 40' to center rule there concerning spreads. I know they have a lot of spread axle refer's running around there. Note that some spread axle refers are set up to slide where a single axle can be slid independantly or both together as a set.
     
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