Whats your take on this???

Discussion in 'Experienced Truckers' Advice' started by Cruisin thru, Mar 10, 2016.

  1. Bdog

    Bdog Road Train Member

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    The driver was a moron and deserved what he got. Of course you need a CDL to pull a ten ton trailer. I for one am glad they are getting these idiots off the road that are running class A rigs with no CDL, no dot number, nothing.
     
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  3. PayCheck

    PayCheck Medium Load Member

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    Your not 26k driving a single axle day cab. Try diving that across the country with a class c license.

    it's not about the gross weight, it's the rating. Basically it's not if your doing it, it all about can you do it.
     
  4. Cruisin thru

    Cruisin thru Bobtail Member

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    Yeah. I guess mainly I posted this because its proof of where the law is. Its the "Potential" to carry over 10,001lbs on a trailer that puts 4 wheelers into CDL territory. I cant cant count how many heavy flatbeds i see everyday on I-15...(even empty) Speaking of that I know a lot of landscapers pulling those dumpbed 14k trailers......just kind of weird that cops may just choose to look the other way or ruin your day. lol
     
  5. Bdog

    Bdog Road Train Member

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    The video didn't say anything about 10,000lb I don't think. I have a poor connection here and can't watch again right now it but they are popping these people because they are over 26k GCVWR. In Texas (where this was filmed) you don't automatically need a CDL if your trailer is over 10k unless the combo is over 26k. I have non CDL drivers pulling 14k trailers with 3/4 tons all the time which is perfectly legal. We go through scales and roadside inspections on a regular basis. Now if we hook that same 14k trailer to our dually which has a GVWR of 13k then it needs a CDL driver.
     
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  6. Cruisin thru

    Cruisin thru Bobtail Member

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    Class A truck
    Any combination of vehicles with a GVWR (Gross Vehicle Weight Rating) of 26,001 or more pounds (11,793 kg) provided the GVWR of the vehicle(s) being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds (4536 kg).


    Provided the gvwr of the trailer is over 10,000lbs. So i guess in the video the trailer is grossed out at 20,000lbs and combined with the pickup truck at over 10k then he was in cdl country. So where i may be wrong is if he hauled a 14k trailer with a truck under 12k gross then it might work.....interesting.
     
  7. Bdog

    Bdog Road Train Member

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    Yes that is all correct. To be a class A you have to be over 26 with a trailer over 10. A trailer over 10 alone doesn't require one in most states. Some such as commiefornia are different.
     
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  8. sawmill

    sawmill Road Train Member

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    In my state they have signs up in the driver license office saying that CDL is required for tandem dually goosenecks behind pickups. Pretty sure that farmers and ranchers will be exempt like usual.

    I have a friend who got pulled over in Montana pulling a two axle car hauler. He had a little ASV skid steer on it. Being an honest guy when the trooper asked him where he was going he told the truth, saying he was going to do a side job for the company he worked for (oilfield chemicals) by doing some landscaping at the new plant they had just built. According to the trooper that made him a commercial operation and he then recieved a speeding ticket for not doing the truck speed limit. If he would have just said he was going to his Grandma's house to dig up a bush or something he would have been fine.

    But they're just trying to keep us all safe, right? They can't possibly be motivated by the revenue generated by fines, right?
     
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  9. Bdog

    Bdog Road Train Member

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    I agree with the revenue part. I had my DOT number for six years before we ever got a big truck. You have to have all the DOT crap(minus CDL) for any combo over 10k crossing state lines for business purposes. You could be in a F-150 pulling a single axle bumper pull trailer and be over 10k. You need med card, log book, UCR, dot inspections, etc. It is just a money grab.

    I live in Texas and none of this applies in state so I can take the exact same truck and trailer and drive nonstop from Amarillo to Houston and back and be perfectly legal. No HOS or anything but if want to drive two hours away in the same truck into New Mexico all of a sudden I need all this stuff to be safe.

    That being said these tandem dually guys need some regulation. I see them all the time grossing over 40k with no CDL, DOT number or anything. That is a lot of darn weight for a pickup to stop.
     
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  10. TripleSix

    TripleSix God of Roads

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    He ran into that cop.

    Had a 50m blade heading to LimonCO. Of course, had to go inside the Lamar scale. As I pull on the scale, the ScaleMaster watches carefully to make sure that the trailer wheels are not steering. After they weigh me, my escorts and I go into the scalehouse

    "Driver, do you have a steerman?"

    (My steer was going to speak up, so I stamp on his foot). No sir. The steerman will be meeting us at i70. I will not need to steer until then. While he is talking to me and reading my permit, he redlights a piggyback truck pulling 4 cabs. The driver comes in and he asks the driver his total length. The driver did not know. While reading my registration, he redlights an empty hotshot pickup.Pickup driver comes in. ScaleMaster asks the pickup driver if he was picking up in Colorado. The pickup driver confirmed that he was. The ScaleMaster tells the pickup driver that he was at the legal limit for weight and would not be able to haul a load in Colorado, because his empty weight is right at the GWV limit, hands me back my papers, and starts writing a ticket to the piggyback driver. Impressive!

    As I am walking outside, the next blade is coming into the scale, and the rear wheels steer so the trailer would cross the scale. 'Uh-oh...supercop is going to write someone a big ticket.'

    Years ago, I got my first ticket right after delivering my oversize. I was empty but still had the banner on. I didn't know. My next ticket was at the Manchester, TN scale for bridge law. Id didn't know anything about the bridge law. My company made the switch from tandem flats to spread and I was told that I could put 40000 lbs on the spread. I put a 40000 lb coil on the spread and got a ticket. I didn't understand why I was getting a ticket.

    I reckon I was a steeringwheel holder. Just get in and drive. I actually laugh when I think about those tickets now. I'm in weigh stations all the time. Lots of time they will write you a ticket if you're stupid. I guess I must have been pretty stupid when I first started flatbed.
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2016
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