Why are so many hot shot/car haulers running smaller LT tires?

Discussion in 'Car Hauler and Auto Carrier Trucking Forum' started by Charlies_Contingency, Mar 22, 2021.

  1. Charlies_Contingency

    Charlies_Contingency Bobtail Member

    25
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    Mar 22, 2021
    San Antonio, Texas
    0
    I'm curious if anybody can answer this. Down here in Texas, I'm noticing that the majority of the wedge car haulers with dually axles are running LT truck tires on their trailers. I run only 235/80/16ST tires on all my light trailers unless 235/85/16ST are needed for running a heavier axle single wheel application. While mingling with other drivers at auctions and such, I keep getting the answer that ST tires are giving everybody problems with blowing out, this is news to me, but I only drive around Texas.

    To summarize, if you are running a car hauler or hotshot rig, are you running ST or LT tires and why?

    I find it difficult to reduce size to something like a 245/75/16 when I already have ground clearance issues. I grew up knowing that Trailer Tires go on Trailers, and Truck Tires go on Trucks. What is going on here?

    I just ordered a new set of Hartland 235/80/16ST at $120/ea for my 50ft Kaufman Wedge with tandem 10k oil bath axles, which is why this question has popped into my head. LT tires do not seem to have near enough weight rating, and I like to have beefy tires compared to the axles. I do not enjoy changing china bombs on the side of an interstate when fully loaded.

    Thanks kindly.
     
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  3. Hammer166

    Hammer166 Crusty Information Officer

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    Aug 18, 2007
    ~8600+' and loving it!
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    Two things at play here, shoestring budgets and human nature.

    They're buying LT tires because they can't afford real truck tires. So many amongst the wedgie crowd are woefully under capitalized, and think they're saving money when they're not. A properly maintained, quality heavier tire is less prone to blowout under equivalent load. Note that does not apply to the cheap third world knockoffs, which are over-represented on wedges.

    You generally get what you pay for when it comes to tires. One of my coworkers insists he can't afford Michelins, and tends to run low 2nd tier, or high 3rd tier tires. He's always bragging how he only pays 2/3rds of what I pay for Michelins. But quickly changes the subject when reminded he's buying tires twice as often. Stingers are tough on tires with our high duty cycles along with the restricted airflow resulting in higher operating temps.

    And the second part, human nature? People will come up with the damnedest things to say to justify the unjustifiable. This is pandemic, especially in trucking.
     
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  4. Charlies_Contingency

    Charlies_Contingency Bobtail Member

    25
    27
    Mar 22, 2021
    San Antonio, Texas
    0
    Fair Enough,

    I try not to judge, but it just blows my mind that so many people are running LT tires. I am curious if anybody here that is running them will chime in with something. Having good rubber on the blacktop is one place I will not compromise. I might not buy top brand tires, but I don't buy the cheapest by any means.
     
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