Why trailers almost always have auto inflate on tires, but trucks almost never do?

Discussion in 'Experienced Truckers' Advice' started by PermanentTourist, Jul 18, 2021.

  1. Patriot_Bearing_Supply

    Patriot_Bearing_Supply Bobtail Member

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    Read the sidewall. 110 PSI COLD. Tires do not blow out due to over inflation, within reasonable limits. A tire that is not damaged can hold 150% of the cold pressure easily. I've inflated tires to more than double their cold pressure to get leaking tires to hold air long enough to get cars to the junkyard. Tires blow from HEAT, when the temperature of the tire approaches the cure temperature or cap cure temperature, the tire comes apart. Running the tires under inflated like you are (and 110 PSI HOT is underinflated) makes them run way hotter. If you need qualifications behind my statement, I am ASE master certified both in automotive and medium / heavy truck. However this information is readily available in tire literature.
     
  2. WildTiger1990

    WildTiger1990 Heavy Load Member

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    Ok, guys , guess I learned how to read tire pressure incorrect, thank you all for you advice, I will inflate them to 110 after my 10 hour brake , and will not worry if it will be even 125 plus after few hours of drive time!
    Thanks to all again!
     
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2021
  3. krupa530

    krupa530 Light Load Member

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    Orem, UT
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    So why do tire manufacturers come out with tire inflation tables, if your supposed to just cold inflate what it says on the tire. My steer tires say 120 cold. But that is for 14300 lbs on that axel and I don’t run that heavy on the front. I’d go with what manufacturers recommend, not what your mate says.
     
  4. not4hire

    not4hire Road Train Member

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    I don't even bother with pressures post-trip. I check pressures pre-trip and then thump tires every mid-trip stop and post-trip. If they all sound and feel the same then you should be fine until your next pre-trip. If one doesn't, then you've likely got a leaker, so check it and get it fixed.
     
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  5. not4hire

    not4hire Road Train Member

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    The pressure on the sidewall is the maximum cold inflation pressure for the maximum load. Every manufacturer has a recommended inflation if you're running less than maximum load.
     
  6. krupa530

    krupa530 Light Load Member

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    Orem, UT
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    I know. I was just saying just because it says that on the sidewall doesn’t mean it should be pressured up that high.
     
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  7. Dockbumper

    Dockbumper Road Train Member

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  8. Studebaker Hawk

    Studebaker Hawk Road Train Member

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    The Halo inflation system has been mentioned. Here is the link: $1540 for a tandem axle tractor with dual wheels.
    Apparently reliable technology been around for several years. Clearly the marketplace has not embraced them for reasons unknown;

    Halo Tire Inflator
     
  9. Dockbumper

    Dockbumper Road Train Member

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    Most large fleets probably don't want to incur the cost. My company has auto inflate on all trailers. I really like it. 8 less tires to be overly concerned with. I think the Halo system would be worth the investment for an O/O that is maintenance and cost conscious. If those were coupled with Centramatics all the way around. I think the increased tire life would pay for them over several hundred thousand miles. Just my $.02
     
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  10. krupa530

    krupa530 Light Load Member

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    Orem, UT
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    Good interesting report. Exactly what I was saying about manufacturers recommended tire pressures. Also mentions that most fleets are running their drives and trailer tires overinflated because they stick to the 100psi idea.
    If you look on the door plate, it tells you the pressures it came from the factory with the proper tires, as well as the trailer plate. So mine says 110 steers. 95 drives. And 90 trailer, which compared to manufacturers recommended pressures it’s pretty bob on.
     
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