Zerobreeze Mark 2 portable AC

Discussion in 'Ask An Owner Operator' started by DUNE-T, Apr 30, 2022.

  1. DUNE-T

    DUNE-T Road Train Member

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    IMG20220614065746.jpg IMG20220614083450.jpg IMG20220614091216.jpg Night went well. I woke up at 6.30am, because I got a bit chilly, but thermometer showed almost 80 degrees, I can only assume it's because it was on the shelf, while Zerobreeze was pointed at my bunk.
    The other pics show temp in front of the cab and at the top bunk.
     
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  3. DUNE-T

    DUNE-T Road Train Member

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    This is how much water it drained and how my battery charged is set up. I simply plug it in and it stops by itself when it's charged. I think it was about 5 hrs while testing.
    IMG20220614091123.jpg IMG20220614090913.jpg
     
  4. DUNE-T

    DUNE-T Road Train Member

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    Overall I am happy with the result, since it is what I expected. I did not wake up once till the morning and usually I already run AC at night if the temp is above 72 degrees.
    It's only gonna work if cab is precooled before going to sleep and it's only gonna be fine till about 8am, after that it will become warmer and warmer in the truck.

    For the best performance, like I originally thought, curtains dropped from the top bunk to isolate the bottom, will create very small sleeping space and Zerobreeze can completely freeze you in there.

    People with mid roof or even smaller cabs than my Volvo 770 might be just fine with the closed curtains.
    IMG20220614090103.jpg
     
  5. DUNE-T

    DUNE-T Road Train Member

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    Also, I mostly run Midwest-Central-Northeast and usually take July off, so my nights will rarely be above 80-85 degrees.
    In the south I would assume only closed up bunk will work with this AC unit since it's only 2300 btu
     
  6. TallJoe

    TallJoe Road Train Member

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    So it tested well?!
    I went to the seller's website to take another look...as I am always skeptical about these devices. I am always afraid that they would be like one of those RoadPro 12 V socket vacuum cleaners. lol

    So you decided to get a different - more powerful battery- as the ones they supply are too weak?

    It is a $2K investment then(?).

    Assuming the truck burns 1 gal (at $5.5) per hour in heat like the one this week, then you have 363 hours / 36 full 10-hour nights before it pays for itself.
    It is definitely a quicker return than one of those APUs if only the A/C function is to be considered.
    The still remaining question is the durability of the lithium battery. If it lasts for more than one summer, I think for someone spending multiple nights on the road on each trip, this is an option to have.
    I am about 2-3 nights per week spent in the truck, and I like to do splits so it is typically no more than 7 hours at a time. There are, of course, loading/unloading detentions too.
    Thanks for doing the test. I'll keep an eye on it.
     
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  7. DUNE-T

    DUNE-T Road Train Member

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    Correct, $2k total and I got a different battery, it should last over 12 hrs on full blast, so far it did 10hrs without problems.

    I am happy with this thing and gonna keep it. Gonna setup a better venting, it will allow the curtain to drop down closer to the floor and not have those huge gaps
     
  8. TallJoe

    TallJoe Road Train Member

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    Maybe that thing is powerful enough to cool down the entire cabin of VNL 680. Maybe you should give it a try and see if it does cool your 780, especially if you come up with drainage holes in the floor. I guess there still should be some sort of fresh air exchange opening somewhere not to suffocate yourself but some window opening should be enough. Sometimes, I shut down the engine and forgot to lower the windows down and nothing happened. I woke up feeling perfectly all right. I guess those cabins are not hermetically closed, at least not mine, maybe I have developed some holes below the carpet that I don't know about...
    I'd be comfortable up to 75F, if it is able to do that, then it would be the right device.
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2022
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  9. TallJoe

    TallJoe Road Train Member

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    Regarding my previous posts, what are the thoughts of others about the fresh air exchange? If you close all your windows and doors and shut the engine off, is there enough air in the cabin so that you don't suffocate? It is better to leave some sort of opening ... I have not really thought about it much...but it may be different from a truck to a truck. But if the cabin is very sealed, then the oxygen level may be dangerously dropping as you are asleep. Therefore it is important to remember about leaving some sort of way to let the fresh air at all times...
    As far as I know, wabasto and other in-wall A/C units provide the fresh air from outside, right?
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2022
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  10. DUNE-T

    DUNE-T Road Train Member

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    It's definitely not gonna be enough for the whole cab of my truck. I think an ac unit would need to be like 10000 btu for that. This morning even the top bunk was noticeably warmer than the bottom after the sun was up.
    I gotta remember to get couple more thermometers with me next time to really measure the difference at the same time. In various parts of the cab.
     
  11. skallagrime

    skallagrime Road Train Member

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    Lets call it an 8x8x8 box, 512 cu feet, assuming normal oxygenation of the atmospheric air when going to bed in a sealed cube, how long till its a problem?

    Friday Fiction Facts: Trapped in an airtight room! | Endless Forms Most Beautiful

    "T = Number of hours before CO2 reaches toxic levels and your character(s) could die.

    (Volume of air inside the room in cu ft) x (1% or 0.01)
    T = ---------------------------------------------------------
    (Number of people) x (one person's hourly production of CO2 in cu ft)

    Ill use 512 cu feet, 1% cause thats mild drowsiness from co2 buildup, generally considered fine to easily recover from
    And going to say a person at rest is about 1 cubic feet of co2 exhaled an hour

    So about 5.12 hrs, at 3 % where serious issues start arising thats almost 15 hrs.

    No matter how good your vehicle is sealed though, theres a LOT of air exchange already happening latently, more so the older and less well maintained the door seals are, easily enough that youre not at risk of dying in your cab unless youre also chainsmoking while hyperventilating amd dont come out or open a window for over a day or 2.

    Personally i sleep with everything closed and have managed to not die after 14 hrs straight with truck etc off, no webasto, was 50 degrees and wet, had had a long day.
     
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