colorado class a cdl road test

Discussion in 'Questions From New Drivers' started by zmpart, Apr 3, 2013.

  1. zmpart

    zmpart Light Load Member

    135
    92
    Nov 27, 2010
    0
    Greetings my wife is currently two weeks into her cdl school in denver and i was curious to know, and after much googling and searching on here cant seem to find, does any one know what the actual dmv test consists of? obviously a thorough pretrip inspection, and an on road test for sure, but what about the backing tests? what should she concentrate most on to pass the test? as we will be teaming, i am sure i will end up doing the hard backs and what not, but she needs to at least be good enough to pass the official test. any one with any recent colorado dmv testing experience your answers and posts are highly appreciated.

    Thanks
     
  2. Truckers Report Jobs

    Trucking Jobs in 30 seconds

    Every month 400 people find a job with the help of TruckersReport.

  3. ColoradoGreen

    ColoradoGreen Heavy Load Member

    755
    876
    Mar 1, 2010
    0
    What you focus on when it comes to the backing portion of the test is up to the tester. They can have you do any of the listed backing maneuvers. It's just what the tester wants you to do that day for the test. The same goes for the pre-trip. She won't do a full pre-trip when she goes in for her test, but, she will need to be able to do a full pre-trip because the tester can ask her to do any portion of the pre-trip. You will cover the required areas like the brake test, the lights, etc. But, a great example, when I did my test, I never even had to open the hood.
     
  4. zmpart

    zmpart Light Load Member

    135
    92
    Nov 27, 2010
    0
    good deal, interesting to know both the backing and the pvi being up the tester.
     
  5. ColoradoGreen

    ColoradoGreen Heavy Load Member

    755
    876
    Mar 1, 2010
    0
    When I went in for my test I was asked to check the coupling, the trailer suspension and frame, the lights, brakes, and possibly the tires. I don't remember for sure. Remember, on the test she doesn't just need to check the areas she's asked to, but to communicate that to the tester. You could do a perfect pre-trip, but, if she doesn't say "There is no gap between the fifth-wheel and skid plate." or "The brakes have sufficient lining.", the tester will not know that she checked them.
     
  6. ironpony

    ironpony Road Train Member

    17,502
    12,009
    Sep 23, 2007
    Ask my GPS...
    0
    The route on the drive portion of the test is up to the tester as well. It can be anywhere, but you can just about bet it will have a portion that is challenging. I was hesitant to take the tractor off the road and onto the soft shoulder, preferring to encroach into the other lane... wrong way to do it. Note, that they've already been over their preferred route, so the tester will know what you can get away with up front.
     
  7. FozzyNOK

    FozzyNOK Road Train Member

    1,959
    2,760
    Jul 18, 2007
    Oklahomistan
    0
    The tests in most states are getting harder (takes more skill) and frankly I'm glad I'm not on the ranges anymore having to teach what a lot of states expect new drivers to do. I have a lot of experienced drivers right now that could not pass the CDL skills test for backing. The last test that I had to train an experienced driver to pass was a real nightmare! He had a CDL with no air brake endorsement... so they made him do everything all over.

    There are three basic tests that encompass the CDL test: Road test, Pre-trip (including the in cab test) and the backing portion. Usually you can fail one or all of the tests, usually the one that you did not pass you only have to retest on that section.

    The backing tests could consist of all three of these:
    1. straight line backing over a certain distance
    2. alley dock backing - angle backing into a space with a limited amount of pull ups
    3. offset backing - backing basically to parallel park and have the tractor end up in a certain space.

    The CDL skills test is pretty much standard fare (Federal standards ) with four left turns graded 4 graded right turns, two controlled intersections, two uncontrolled intersections, simulating going up and down a grade, going over a RXR track (simulating hazmat) and going under (and mentioning) a marked overhead clearance. lane changes, maybe highway driving and certainly city driving.

    The skills test routes are NOT random! They have to be designed by the testers and or the state and have to be approved. There CAN be more than one route for a location as to mix the route up so students cannot inform the others.

    Some of this info may be a little out dated, but from what I experienced the tests have not changed much but the backing HAS gotten a lot more complex.
     
  8. Chibob

    Chibob Medium Load Member

    387
    195
    Jul 23, 2012
    Columbia, Missouri
    0
    From what I remember you have to do a pre-trip with 120 different things. There are 7 air brake tests. As far as the driving part, DO NOT float the gears. You have to bouble clutch evry one of them. Also, do not shift while going through an intersection. What I mean is, if you start out from a stop light you need to be in at least 4th gear so you can get through without shifting.

    Backing up is 100 feet in a straight line, set up and back into a simulated dock door , and you have to do a parallel park on the blind side.

    If the school she is going to has their own tester, he will try to make sure she passes. If she has to go to a state cdl testing station then it is luck of the draw whether the tester will be helpful or a jerk.
     
  9. ColoradoGreen

    ColoradoGreen Heavy Load Member

    755
    876
    Mar 1, 2010
    0
    Chibob - I think it's changed quite a bit since you had to take your test (also, different region, I take it you're from the Chicago area?) I can assure you that I did not get up to 120 different things to check on my pre-trip, and shifting while going through an intersection was allowed (although, you had to double-clutch, and you could NOT shift while on railroad tracks). Did not have to do a parallel parking maneuver, either. Also, Colorado does not have state-run CDL stations to my knowledge, all handled by 3rd party testers.
     
  10. Allow Me.

    Allow Me. Trucker Forum STAFF Staff Member

    9,763
    9,234
    May 28, 2009
    Rancho Mirage, Ca.
    0
    ASK the DMV tester what he requires. As an example, ask if he wants you to double clutch or if you can float. He may say, a little of both or whatever you want to do. Ca. only requires you to double clutch a couple times during the test. So, why beat yourself up double clutching if the tester will let you float ? Same with downshifting, a couple downshifts during the test are OK, to show him you know how. Again, don't beat yourself up downshifting every approach to a red light. But you should ask him when you are ready to start the road test. Same with skills, ask him just what you're expected. How many pull-ups, GOAL's etc. His interest is that you know how to drive and be in complete control of the truck at all times. He knows you're brand new to trucking. Yes, he can be a jerk, but, just be cool and calm and at least appear that you know your stuff.
     
  11. FozzyNOK

    FozzyNOK Road Train Member

    1,959
    2,760
    Jul 18, 2007
    Oklahomistan
    0
    Never heard the shifting in intersections thing.. thats just silly.. no changing lanes in an intersection and no shifting while turning, but you'd have to site the reg or most the paragraph from the CDL manual for me to believe that one.
     
  • Truckers Report Jobs

    Trucking Jobs in 30 seconds

    Every month 400 people find a job with the help of TruckersReport.

  • Draft saved Draft deleted