Extended Sleepers

Discussion in 'Ask An Owner Operator' started by BigRigNate2021, Nov 25, 2023.

  1. BigRigNate2021

    BigRigNate2021 Bobtail Member

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    Nov 28, 2021
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    This is aimed toward the small group that have the massive RV-type sleepers (kitchen and bathroom with running water). I’m curious if anyone lives in their truck full-time (as opposed to paying rent/mortgage on a place they’re rarely staying)? What make/model do you own? And what sort of freight do you usually haul, with a truck that size? Would love to know how you guys do it, and what sort of major differences there are (besides the obvious) in all aspects of the day to day.
    I’m thinking about getting one, but I can’t seem to find a ton of info for what to expect. I don’t want to make this huge financial commitment without being informed as much as possible.
     
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  3. blairandgretchen

    blairandgretchen Road Train Member

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    Well, looks here like you've found yourself a GREAT topic for me to discuss while cooking lasagna. From scratch, not that Stouffers stuff.

    Well, not exactly from scratch - I'm yet to learn how to make my own pasta.

    Whatcha wanna know, fella?
     
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  4. blairandgretchen

    blairandgretchen Road Train Member

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    It's not really massive. 120" (10 feet for the average handyman) sleeper, precariously perched on a 1995 Pete 379 frame, securely held with extra strength duct-tape for added safety.

    The differences include things like - not waiting for

    "SHOWER NUMBER 17 - YOUR SHOWER IS READY . . . PLEASE PROCEED TO THE SHOWERS"

    "Uhhh, honey - Arby's just closed - umm, is there any cans of tuna in the cupboard?"

    You know, just basic fun trucking stuff.
     
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  5. BigRigNate2021

    BigRigNate2021 Bobtail Member

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    For the most part, I’m curious what sort of freight you haul. I can’t imagine many shippers have a yard big enough to accommodate the extra length of the truck. Lately, I’ve been delivering to shippers that can barely fit a normal truck, let alone one with an extended cab and a longer wheelbase. What do you do to avoid complications getting into different shippers?
     
  6. blairandgretchen

    blairandgretchen Road Train Member

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    You can haul flatbed, step deck, van, oversized, a lot of household movers use them exclusively. The weight difference isn't a lot more than a regular OTR rig.

    For tight spots, you can always drop trailer, and hand out a few Benjamins to the yard dog to put it in the hole if you can't fit.

    I don't see a lot pulling Amazon trailers though.
     
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  7. Willy Wonty

    Willy Wonty Light Load Member

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    A sink and a bathroom? Ho lee crap, I had no idea they could be that nice. I had my microwave and toaster oven under the bunk and I thought it was the lap of luxury. Cascadia life indeed.
     
  8. loudtom

    loudtom Road Train Member

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    https://www.amazon.com/KitchenAid-KSMPRA-3-Piece-Roller-Attachment/dp/B01DBGQR1K/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?hvadid=267941668267&hvdev=c&hvlocphy=9015282&hvnetw=g&hvqmt=e&hvrand=7832529153033057795&hvtargid=kwd-473197450794&hydadcr=28358_9997915&keywords=kitchenaid+attachment+pasta+maker&qid=1700948133&sr=8-1-spons&sp_csd=d2lkZ2V0TmFtZT1zcF9hdGY&th=1

    Super easy, super quick, but can get messy. You can also mix the dough by hand and use a hand crank roller, but since the dough should be made dry it's a lot of work to get it right. You can start with a wetter mix and then add flour as you put it through the rollers, but you'll have to run it through the machine a few times until it's the right texture. With the stand mixer, you just add the ingredients until it forms a bunch of dry pea shaped pieces, then you add a slight bit of water to bind it together, it shouldn't be sticky at all. Dust it with flour, run it through the roller attachment, drop it in the pot, and done.

    You can cook pasta noodles with a broth and some soy sauce to make Asian dishes. You can pan cook the pasta instead of boiling it in a pot and the starches will help the sauce thicken. If your noodles are too wet going into the pan, they will want to clump together, so make it dry enough that they can separate.

    If you make lasagna, you'll want to add enough sauce and cover the top so it steams the upper noodle, otherwise it will be crispy. Raviolis come out really well, but you can't make them as dry or they won't seal when you close them up unless you add water as you press them. You can also make them as an Asian dish and it makes a good won ton. If you deep fry them instead of boiling, they come out really nice, and you can also stuff them with Indian spices and make samosas.
     
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  9. blairandgretchen

    blairandgretchen Road Train Member

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    South west Missouri
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    My mind got slightly fractured there, we have a pasta roller, and it's been a kitchen ornament for years.

    I think I might have to get my hands dirty - Italian, or Asian style.
     
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