Illinois -- Forklift with counterweight slabs -- indivisible load?

Discussion in 'Heavy Haul Trucking Forum' started by ichudov, Jan 9, 2021.

  1. ichudov

    ichudov Heavy Load Member

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    I am in Illinois. I have semi trucks and a large "Versa-Lift 60-80" forklift that has counterweight slabs in the back that can be added or removed as necessary.

    The forklift without counterweights is 41,000 lbs and slabs (up to 6) are 5,000 lbs each.

    My quarterly OSOW permit allows me to carry up to 100,000 lbs on five axles. That would allow me to carry a forklift with up to four counterweight slabs.

    So far so good, but is that a "divisible load" since the slabs will be taken out? Is there an exemption for one or more counterweights that can stay with the overweight object being transported?

    This way I can send one truck instead of two, a big deal for me.

    Thanks
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2021
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  3. blairandgretchen

    blairandgretchen Road Train Member

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  4. ichudov

    ichudov Heavy Load Member

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    Thanks! What if I just weld in three slabs? Then they are not removable? I do know that it is a shenanigan, but would it work?

    The slabs sit in a well, you see, and it is very easy to weld a couple of them in. It would cover most situations, the question is would a DOT office seeing them welded, realistically disagree about this load being indivisible?
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2021
  5. Farmtractor9900

    Farmtractor9900 Light Load Member

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    " If it can be divided and it does not exceed 8 – man-hours to disassemble it, then it must be separated."
     
  6. m16ty

    m16ty Road Train Member

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    We move our 60/80 Versa-lift fully loaded in TN. TN law states “Equipment can be hauled fully equipped to do it’s intended task”. I have no idea about IL, but read their OS regs and see what it says.

    That being said, we will still sometimes move it with the bare machine and forks on 1 load, and counterweights and boom on the other. In order to fit within TN law, you have to have the counterweights on the machine and the boom attached (not in the boom stand). Also, they can nail you for the boom stand if it’s on the load.
     
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  7. ichudov

    ichudov Heavy Load Member

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    Thank you m16ty, if this would apply to me in Illinois it would be amazing. I might just stop by a weight station and ask them but I will also read the regulations tonight!!!
     
  8. m16ty

    m16ty Road Train Member

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    The TN law was intended for local contractors moving things like excavators, and not having to remove their buckets to move from job to job. It also applies to forklifts, you just have to be permitted for the weight and not over-axle.
     
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  9. m16ty

    m16ty Road Train Member

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    The reason we often have to break it down into 2 loads is the boom stand. If you want to swap between boom and forks, you pretty much have to have the boom stand, and it is considered a separate piece. If you are going to have to have a separate truck just for the stand, you might as well haul the counterweights on the second load too.
     
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  10. ichudov

    ichudov Heavy Load Member

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    I just learned that Illinois also has "intended use" provisions. ``Non-divisible load or vehicles: Permit loads are deemed to be reasonably dismantled (non-divisible) if, when separated into smaller loads or vehicles, for the dismantling would: 1) Compromise the intended use of the load or vehicle; that is, make it unable to perform the function for which it was intended; ''

    So, if the forklift's job is to lift, say, 50,000 lbs today and that requires three slabs, this is the intended use for today and thus the slabs are permissible. At least this is how I understand it.

    I would have to stay under 100k on five axles, which is fine. I can have up to 4 slabs this way if I only carry forks. I do drive around weight stations where possible, but still like to stay legal and thus I have quarterly permits.
     
  11. ichudov

    ichudov Heavy Load Member

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    m16ty, thanks for your perspective since you operate the same forklift. I would think that often, a second truck is necessary anyway to carry extra tools, torch etc. But in many instances we just need the bare forklift. Your input is greatly appreciated and thanks for pointing me to look in the right direction.
     
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