Load locks

Discussion in 'Swift' started by fairshake, Jan 12, 2011.

  1. fairshake

    fairshake Medium Load Member

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    In every trailer I used mine in they never fit, too short placed horizontally of course. Close to the floor they will kinda get snug, but not tight enough to properly secure a load or where they need to be up higher. I have a couple straps, but many of the trailers don't have the slots for those either. Ive tried many different ones left at yards etc. what do yall do? Or do you just throw em in there and seal the door?? :biggrin_25514:
     
  2. NWMAXI

    NWMAXI Road Train Member

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    when i was with swift they supplied the long bar style load locks... i ended up buying the 4 peice racheting style because they actualy held and were long enough to be snug in place they are more pricey but it was worth it to me
     
  3. Injun

    Injun Road Train Member

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    I carry a few short pieces of 2x4...about 6 inches long and put a piece between the end of the load lock and the wall. It takes some doing until you're used to doing it, but it works like a charm.
     
  4. Palazon

    Palazon Road Train Member

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    Most of the ones our shop issued were long enough, but carried a few 2x4 blocks like Injun said too.
     
    scottied67 Thanks this.
  5. Road Dog

    Road Dog Medium Load Member

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    You need to secure them on a rib to get maximum holding power.I have always had good luck using themIf you use them in between the ribs you are putting pressure on perhaps a sheet of plywood,which will not hold.
     
  6. fairshake

    fairshake Medium Load Member

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    Oct 4, 2010
    Chickenville, BFE
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    I'm guessing the ones I have are just too short then, tried about 5 different ones, most of the trailers the "rib" is external on the outside not offering any help on width inside of the trailer and ribs aren't always where the load is needing secured/blocked in. Using the blocks of wood on the end doesn't allow much friction, just tap the lock and it slides easily (try it, little bump and pop, imagine a 2k pallet bump), need a brace or rubber contact at least. Id rather use straps, cause you can move them around freight better and they don't have to be exactly near the freight.

    REAL SECURED, not just I got my load locks tight "someplace" in the trailer lol.
     
  7. Injun

    Injun Road Train Member

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    If you're having your load locks fall down despite spacing them with wood (or rubber) you are not placing them tight enough. It shouldn't be easy to clamp them. If it is, extend them out a little further. If friction is that much of a problem, glue some coarse sandpaper to your spacers.

    Yes, straps are very effective. But when 90% of what you do is drop and hook, you kind of get tired of replacing them. Load lock bars are all over the company. If I need one, I wait until I'm at the next terminal and get one or two from the shop. They almost always have load lock bars. I have yet to see straps.

    On a side note, not all box or reefer trailers have mooring points for straps. However, they all have walls.
     
    The Challenger Thanks this.
  8. RobertSmith

    RobertSmith Medium Load Member

    I will put them in kinda angled, (one side higher then the other) and its tight then kinda stand on it a bit to get it to slide down and level, that makes it pretty tight. For the top one I do that but one side towards me, then hit it backwards till its level and against the frieght. Not sure if I typed that in away that it makes sense, but thats one thing my mentor showed me that works well.
     
    scottied67 Thanks this.
  9. scottied67

    scottied67 Road Train Member

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    Speaking of drops and hooks, sometimes you lose your load locks too. So try to carry extra ones. I can hold 6 on my load lock carrier by using a ratchet strap to secure them. This way if I need to lose 2 of them, I still have the minimum number of 4 required. Sometimes you'll be at a shipper that requires 2 load locks thrown in the trailer before you enter the gate and invariably there will be another Swifty in the line who did his arrive at shipper then decided to read the special instructions at that time finally, and starts begging on the CB if anyone has extra load locks lol. This way by carrying 6 you could potentially help 4 Swifties who needed just 1 or 2 Swifties who needed 2.
     

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  10. DickJones

    DickJones Road Train Member

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    home depot has ones made out of 2x4s with a plastic "foot" on the ends....they just hammer them in place.

    but for regular load bars, most of the time in order to get two to work, you have to put one in, then the other. when u put the 2nd one in the first one will fall out of place. you just go back and forth till they both stay in place. might take a few times, but you can't just ratchet them in place, knowing they'll fall to the floor of the trailer the moment you put the truck in gear and roll.
     
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