Retread tire cost

Discussion in 'Ask An Owner Operator' started by Dino soar, Oct 19, 2019.

  1. "semi" retired

    "semi" retired Road Train Member

    7,846
    14,515
    Apr 16, 2014
    high plains colorado
    0
    That and excessive speed with a load. Like I say, I picked up a lot of rail cans in Chicago, most all had 10x20 recaps, and most always low on pressure. Middle of the night, nobody around, no air hoses, what to do? I rigged up an air line off my trailer hoses for full tires and kept the speed to 55-60, and greatly reduced the chance of failure. Then there were the schmoes that hooked on to a wagon, never kicked the tires, go barreling by me at 70 mph loaded, with their big Cat motors and all, they never made the state line without peeling both on an axle, and there they sat waiting on a service call.
     
    Studebaker Hawk and Long FLD Thank this.
  2. Truckers Report Jobs

    Trucking Jobs in 30 seconds

    Every month 400 people find a job with the help of TruckersReport.

  3. starmac

    starmac Road Train Member

    6,677
    12,487
    Apr 11, 2019
    Fairbanks Ak
    0
    Most of the older cans I have hauled had the 10-20 bias tires, they were not good at handling weight and speed even new virgin. I worked in a tire shop while in high school when everybody ran bias split rims, sure don't miss those things.
    I still have some on a flatbed dump, but it gets very few miles and tops out at 55 too. lol
     
  4. x1Heavy

    x1Heavy Road Train Member

    34,029
    41,344
    Mar 5, 2016
    White County, Arkansas
    0
    Junk it.

    Do not use retreads.

    Again retreads when they fail 100 miles down the road will make you cry tears over the damage and even more losses for trying to save a dollar.

    Do not use retreads. If a tire is too far gone? Toss it. Grab a good tire and put it on there and go forth.
     
    "semi" retired Thanks this.
  5. Shawn2130

    Shawn2130 Medium Load Member

    496
    851
    Sep 20, 2015
    Ontario
    0
    We use retreads on dump truck and cement truck.

    2 of our tractors have retreads as well but they’re local haulers.

    The 2 tractors I drive have virgin rubber all around and same goes for the trailers.

    As of right now, we are out of retreads and the dump trucks will be using virgin rubber next.

    None of the trucks have retreads on the steers. Too risky. Especially the 425, 455 wide based types.

    When they blow, they blow. There goes the hood fenders, possibly the air tanks, battery box or whatever is behind the tire.

    Or truck ends up crashing into the ditch or a wall on the freeway.

    I was driving one dump truck, saw many pieces of what I recognized as from one of our dump trucks, picked up the pieces that were scattered all over the road after a lift axle tire exploded.

    Both metal mud flap mounts under the dump box blew off, both of the fuel tank steps on the driver side shot off, dent in the fuel tank, dent in the box above, dent in the hydraulic oil tank that was behind the lift axle.

    That was a lot of welding to repair the truck. The dents are still there to this day from 4 years ago.
     
  6. blairandgretchen

    blairandgretchen Road Train Member

    8,702
    37,459
    Dec 9, 2011
    South west Missouri
    0
    Don’t wanna sound like a Richard Cranium here, but - is this business not profitable enough to afford buying new tires - and running them to minimum tread depth and replacing?

    I don’t spend much on chrome and fancy stuff, but I sure as heck spend $ on anything that fends off a service truck or a tow truck.

    Just saying.
     
  7. starmac

    starmac Road Train Member

    6,677
    12,487
    Apr 11, 2019
    Fairbanks Ak
    0
    I bought a set of new drives a couple of months ago.
    Don't forget we get to pay an Alaska premium for everything. lol

    If I waited for my tires to be capped I could get tires for 170 some odd bucks'
    Without my caseings and just outright buying recaps, I would save a little over 50 bucks a tire over the cost of new uniroyal lugs, and that was with new valve stems and after fet. It was a no brainer, with the caps I would have had nothing when I wore them out, they will give me 150 bucks trade in or I can have these capped if I want to when they get to that point.
    So if nothing else besides the trade in value, in the long run new tires, these particular ones were almost 100 bucks cash money cheaper than caps.
    I seldom run much over 50 or 55 for any length of time and the ground is never hot here, I see the company trucks get by with some pretty shabby caps, but we also do not run over 85 pounds pressure, just the piece of mind is worth something, since it is 500 miles between places to buy a tire. lol
     
    Tx Countryboy and Tug Toy Thank this.
  8. Shawn2130

    Shawn2130 Medium Load Member

    496
    851
    Sep 20, 2015
    Ontario
    0
    I do find that recaps last a long time depending on types of tread.

    I put 125,000 miles on a set of recap drives on a tractor in 4 years, while another driver drove the truck before I did.

    On the dump trucks, they have a short life due to excessive turning but likely the virgin rubber may only last the same or less or maybe a little more.

    But I often times see the caps start separating which I then change out.

    Some of our drivers don’t seem to bother checking tires and then come back to the yard with only sidewalls left.

    One even drove back to the yard with a half flat 425 wide based front tire while still loaded.

    He said he was only 5 mins away, but that don’t matter.

    I peeled the tire off the rim and was scooping out handfuls of sidewall rubber that separated internally.

    That tire had lots of tread left but is scrapped.

    Driver should’ve waited till someone came out with a air line and filled the tire up.

    As I’m usually the one that changes tires, I’m sure if the tires were good brand virgins, with a good life span and good maintenance, I wouldn’t be changing as many and keep trucking.

    Keep the cash rolling in, customers happy etc.

    For the dump trucks, recaps usually still make a better choice than virgins as they often times get damaged by something and most times they’re cheaper.

    Like for example, a dump driver that we recently fired, drove the sidewall of 2 outside drive tires on the passenger side over the edge of a scale I-beam. Both sidewalls got rubber peeled to the cords.

    I replaced 3 tires with left over recaps from other trucks when they got newer recaps put on.
     
  9. x1Heavy

    x1Heavy Road Train Member

    34,029
    41,344
    Mar 5, 2016
    White County, Arkansas
    0
    A friend of mine who manned a dumptruck tandem had a dual blow out which somehow took out everything on the far side while on a flyover ramp for 695 north west of Baltimore. Somehow or other he kept the whole thing, rocks and all (20 ton) from spilling and slamming into the rush pack below. I helped replaced bearings a few months after that accident with that particular truck. And she did ok. Just had to watch it when it's just light rain. Get away from you and slid on any braking at all. (Tires when empty)
     
  10. Shawn2130

    Shawn2130 Medium Load Member

    496
    851
    Sep 20, 2015
    Ontario
    0
    X1heavy:

    I sure don’t want to see that happening myself or to any trucker out there.
     
  • Truckers Report Jobs

    Trucking Jobs in 30 seconds

    Every month 400 people find a job with the help of TruckersReport.

  • Draft saved Draft deleted