Snackbar's new adventure at Moore Freight Services

Discussion in 'Discuss Your Favorite Trucking Company Here' started by supersnackbar, Jan 6, 2018.

  1. mitrucker

    mitrucker Road Train Member

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    It’s a driver thing. We spend way too much time alone.
     
  2. BKLusk64

    BKLusk64 Light Load Member

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    How long do you stay out? Is there any pay other than mileage?
     
  3. supersnackbar

    supersnackbar Road Train Member

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    I personally stay out 4-6 weeks. Some drivers go home every month for regular hometime, and pass thru the house occasionally thru the month. They only hire drivers that live within their regular freight lanes so hometime isn't an issue. They pretty much run everywhere except the extreme west coast.

    They pay detention after 3 hours, $50 holiday pay after 90 days, $100 layover after 24 hours and on the occasion that you have to live load, they pay you a $30 load fee. Short haul pay is $150 for loads under 200 miles (plus $.55/mile for the empty miles to return to the plant). Loads between 200-300 miles pay $200 (plus the $.55/mile for empty miles back to the plant)

    The empty miles are paid different here. You are paid for the empty miles you run after delivery instead of before. And...are paid before you run them. Deliver the afternoon of payroll cutoff, and you are paid for the load and return miles even if it will be days later before you get to the plant.
     
  4. Surfer Joe

    Surfer Joe Heavy Load Member

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    You're not a glazier so where's the danger in handling the glass?
    Still, I give you six months.
     
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  5. carramrod32

    carramrod32 Heavy Load Member

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    Subscribed, Don't feed the Trolls!
     
  6. drvrtech77

    drvrtech77 Road Train Member

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    I can say from experience hauling glass on flatbed is that it can shatter in enroute and be somewhat dangerous pulling the tarp off..
     
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  7. supersnackbar

    supersnackbar Road Train Member

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    Thankfully we don't do things like Maverick does with their tarps and A-frames. The way this company's equipment is set up, the tarps are mounted to the trailer so, you are out of harms way when you are pulling them out of the way. The real danger comes when you are unstrapping. If it's broke, it still has to come off and you have to stand in front of the glass to release the straps and remove hardware.

    Six months for what, me getting hurt or #####ing? If it's the latter, don't count on it. I haven't had this positive of an attitude and outlook about a company and my future for decades.

    As for the danger, as @drvrtech77 pointed out, you have to work around the glass to unsecure it...if it's broke (and everyone who hauls glass will have some breakage at some point), you still have to get it unloaded, and to do that you have to unsecure it, which means you have to put yourself next to the broken load to release it. Plus, every edge of the glass is razor sharp. The advice from the experienced drivers I have spoken to is "you're gonna get cut, it's not an 'if' but a 'when', keep some of those small tubes of superglue with you. It's cheaper than a container of 'newskin' and works just as good". One of my unloads in PA doesn't use gloves because he likes to go by feel when picking up the glass off the trailer. He was 1/2 thru unloading me when he bumped his knuckle on an edge...he dropped the remote for the crane and quickly trotted to the 1st aid kit. He had sliced about 3" of his knuckle, from just a bump...and he has been working around glass 30 years... He said the same thing, cuts are gonna happen, even when you have your safety gear on. When that customer I mentioned dropped that pack of glass, if a driver had been near it, they could have been seriously hurt or killed.
     
  8. x1Heavy

    x1Heavy Road Train Member

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    My first winter OTR involved going to Lexington KY to collect Auto Glass for GM in Baltimore. It's fun. Didnt break any that I know of otherwise they would have yelled. Specifically windshields for GM Astro vans. (Ugh...) It also involved big snow that year in the mountains of WVa. I suppose it's a great practice because that truck absolutely has to be there to get that glass. Otherwise the factory will stop. And that's very expensive.
     
  9. supersnackbar

    supersnackbar Road Train Member

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    When I was a Creten, we would haul automotive glass from the PPG plant in Mercer PA. Fortunately we weren't on hot loads that went directly to the plant, but they still didn't give us a lot of extra time on the load. Thankfully, Moore doesn't do automotive, only glass for buildings, so the schedules, many times, are the more laid back fcfs deliveries. I've heard stories about how much companies get charged for late automotive glass loads. With todays traffic and temperamental epa approved trucks, it would make one think twice about contracting such loads.
     
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  10. BKLusk64

    BKLusk64 Light Load Member

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    Sounds like you don't have to flip flop days and nights. I would guess most all deliveries at days shift. How many miles a week do you average? What system do they use for their mileage caculations?
     
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