Why trailers almost always have auto inflate on tires, but trucks almost never do?

Discussion in 'Experienced Truckers' Advice' started by PermanentTourist, Jul 18, 2021.

  1. flood

    flood Road Train Member

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    jason6541 Thanks this.
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  3. Banker

    Banker Road Train Member

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    EBF3B15E-F939-4DA3-A156-9DA431244BEE.png
    I have used the halo system on my drives for almost 6 years and they are well worth the $1,400 they cost me. My trailer has the Hendrickson system and it cost roughly $1,200 and worth it also. FBC6F682-6AA3-4CD5-AA27-0B9A5223E7CD.png
     
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  4. Colt6920

    Colt6920 Light Load Member

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    The manufacturers and engineers are not dumb, they specify 110 PSI COLD for a reason- they know that tires will heat up during driving.
    They account for the pressure increase when the tire is hot, and so specify the cold pressure with that in mind, to provide proper inflation at all times. When the tire is hot and is at 125 psi, the engineers know that will happen, and have made sure the tire is still good to go in that state.

    In addition, underinflation causes blowouts, not overinflation. Overinflation just leads to center tread wear. Underinflation allows the tire to flex, building heat, weakening the rubber until the tire blows.
     
  5. Dockbumper

    Dockbumper Road Train Member

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    You are absolutely right. But........the OP has his mind made up. He has SGITR syndrome.
     
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  6. not4hire

    not4hire Road Train Member

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    Maybe instead of the "Maximum Cold Pressure" information, manufacturers should put pV = nRT = nkBNAT on the sidewall and let these uber-smart drivers figure it out. :biggrin_2559:
     
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  7. Dockbumper

    Dockbumper Road Train Member

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    Makes sense to me. It is too hard to figure out the words on a steer tire. Max Pressure 120 psi COLD. They really need to make it more understandable for overly smart people.:rolleyes:o_O
     
  8. Judge

    Judge Road Train Member

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  9. mem

    mem Light Load Member

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    Our TPMS saved us from a brake fire. New truck had an issue with an auto slack adjuster and wife was driving i70 near Vail. She asked me what does hot tire mean and I said pull the #### over. Brake drum was sizzling due to the lining rubbing against it.
     
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  10. God prefers Diesels

    God prefers Diesels Road Train Member

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    "Cold PSI" is 68 degrees. If the tire is colder, it will be less, as cold air is denser. If hotter, PSI will rise as the air expands. If you're running 110 hot, then your tires are low. This pressure makes the tire hold a certain profile. If it can't maintain that profile, it flexes more, and the added heat causes it to blow.

    If your sidewall says "110 PSI cold", that means "110 PSI cold".
     
  11. Dockbumper

    Dockbumper Road Train Member

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    In actuality, it is not "common" at all. I stick my steers EVERY MORNING. Check my drives with a gauge every Monday morning. That is my routine. Thump drives and trailer tires every time I stop during a walk around.
     
    No Exit, kylefitzy and MadScientist Thank this.
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