Will I be properly trained ?

Discussion in 'Flatbed Trucking Forum' started by Mike11225, Mar 30, 2019.

  1. Mike11225

    Mike11225 Bobtail Member

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    I'm a Tanker driver, and was thinking about getting into flatbed....

    My concerned is ..will I be properly trained to tie down and tarp the loads ? I often look at flatbed loads and wonder to myself " how do they know how to tie that down ???
     
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  3. x1Heavy

    x1Heavy Road Train Member

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    Hook here, hook there, crank until tight. Done.

    If it's really bad, cover it up.

    HE HE HE. //TEASING.
     
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  4. D.Tibbitt

    D.Tibbitt Road Train Member

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    Every load is different, once you understand the basic concept of what chains do and what straps do, what the wll of your equipment is and what the regulations are then u get to a point where whatever they put on ur trailer u cab find a way to tie it down, thats why i love it and everybody else does too , its something to tske pride in but it will take some time to get the hang of it
     
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  5. D.Tibbitt

    D.Tibbitt Road Train Member

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    You would probably enjoy it , if u like the work of tanker, flatbed is similar except we are cooler lol just dont do it for the money because the money wont ever be worth it when ur throwing tarps in 30mph winds or breaking chains and binders out of ice
     
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  6. x1Heavy

    x1Heavy Road Train Member

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    Or taking naps on top of foam roofing loads in the company yard rather than commute home under the stars. Snooze under a tarp at 8 PM up and going at 3 am when the tractor row you are in cranks up. DOT calls that sleeper berth. (Too tired to commute home and deal with all the make drivel there) and at that time the commute was only 3 miles.

    Nobody ever looks up there, so you sabotage the tractor in some way so when they curse the POS not moving... it's a chance to come off there before you move.

    I tend to make light and funny out of difficult problems.

    You will be taught to load where and how and how many. Shingles 6 pallets here and 4 there. For example. Two tarps and cover them up. Or aluminum coils eye to sky based on your deck for axle weight etc. A 11K, a 14K and a 10K You can put a 52000 pound payload onto a Ravens. It has to be perfect to the inch for it to work.

    When a load is done right and wrapped like present, DOT never ever pays attention to it. Now if it's loose, flappy and sloppy slack jingle chain and flapping strap oy!.... you there.... etc.
     
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  7. Diesel Dave

    Diesel Dave Last Few of the OUTLAWS

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    It never ends...... :lurk: “what did he say”?
    I’m starting to understand my moms dementia better now.....
     
  8. HillbillyDeluxeTruck

    HillbillyDeluxeTruck Road Train Member

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    I give you real info, not warhblegarble.

    A training company will go over proper strapping before putting you on the road I believe, but other companies expect their drivers to know DOT regs.

    Sometimes it takes an extra bit of thinking and common sense for oddball stuff, but generally if you know the regs and do more than the bare minimum then you should be gtg. A lot of stuff can only be learned by doing.

    There are guys running flatbed that can seemingly barely tie their shoes but still manage to strap stuff down, so you'll be fine.
     
  9. blairandgretchen

    blairandgretchen Road Train Member

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    Ask for training. I went from doubles to flat 4 years ago. No problem with some practical advice and attention to detail.
     
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  10. loudtom

    loudtom Road Train Member

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    Driver's Handbook on Cargo Securement - Introduction

    Have the company teach you how to secure the excess of your straps, what to do and what not to do, when to use edge protectors, etc. Find out how to use chains with ratchet and/or snap binders.

    Then ask the people who are loading you for advice. If it's delicate like drywall, foam board, concrete pipes, then they should be able to help you with how much to tighten it.

    If there are other drivers around, you can watch or ask them as well. Just make sure that no matter what advice you're given, that it follows the guidelines set forth in the regulations. When in doubt, add extra securement or block/brace it from moving. If you carry dunnage, you can learn to build a bulkhead with it. You can also strap an X shape around the front and rear of some cargo to help contain it. You can also choke some loads together.

    Every time you stop, check your securement. I usually stop once within 30 miles of leaving, then every 2 hours or so. If a road is really rough, I will stop and check sooner. If you notice a strap or chain getting loose, find a safe spot to park and tighten it up a bit before it gets worse.
     
  11. Zeviander

    Zeviander Road Train Member

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    Find some other company drivers out on the road, or owner operators, that are pulling trailers with loads that have tight straps and neatly-done tarps and engage them in conversation. Most flat deck operators will be very forthcoming with information on how to strap and tarp loads, and if they have the time, will go over things with you.

    Most flat deck companies that hire experienced drivers will train, but it will be introductory. They aren't going to show you how to do everything, but give you the basics to go from there. As @HillbillyDeluxeTruck already said, know your minimums from the regulations, then add more from there and in most cases you'll be okay.
     
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