Hooking up doubles for the first time.

Discussion in 'Questions From New Drivers' started by jgarciajr40, Aug 5, 2020.

  1. jgarciajr40

    jgarciajr40 Medium Load Member

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    I'll be driving doubles for the first time this weekend; forced linehaul...

    Well, I was hooking everything up for the night crew to get them ready and to simply get some practice; well I have a problem.

    I hooked everything up correctly I believe, but when I went to "stage" the doubles I noticed it felt "heavy" almost like the brakes were applied.

    I had my valves open, and I went to the rear trailer and opened the valve to make sure air was all through the system. I asked someone, and they simply said "brakes on doubles don't release as quick as a single, and some of our Dollys are old so you'll just have to stay there for a minute".

    Does this sound correct to anyone? I did hook up fairly quickly, and released my breaks not waiting like they claimed. I do keep my engine brake at 100% all the time because I only do city driving should I reduce my engine brake?

    I couldn't ask anyone at work because I was the first one done, and we were unmanned pretty much
     
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  3. blairandgretchen

    blairandgretchen Road Train Member

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    They take a little while - maybe 30 seconds for the entire system. Watch your air guages - when they’re back up to 120 it should roll freely.

    If not, go check things.

    I seem to remember some older dollies , you had to turn the tap on the tank.

    Always double check. Hands have been killed between trailers by not following procedures.
     
  4. motocross25

    motocross25 Road Train Member

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    What I was gonna say is exactly what @blairandgretchen stated. The converter dollies I’ve always dealt with have a petcock to release the air. This needs to be open when your splitting your set, to allow the dolly to roll with your first box. So odds are, it’s still open. Push in your red knob and walk back between your trailers and listen for any air spewing out. As stated also, sets do take longer to build air also. Just double check your air lines from your front box to the dolly, and from the dolly to the rear all match up. Red to red, blue to blue. Also what I always did was did everything in a system. There’s a lot to remember when hooking a set. I’d do air lines, trailer legs, and check, re check and check again. If anyone came up and interrupted me I’d start over. Last thing you want to see in the mirror is your back pup hitting the ground when you take off. Other than that, you’ll get used to it and probably learn to like it. I always thought pulling wiggles rode smoother. Good luck!
     
  5. CaliTrucker1982

    CaliTrucker1982 Bobtail Member

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    Ya doubles suck at times. Wish you luck and be safe.
     
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  6. LtlAnonymous

    LtlAnonymous Road Train Member

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    It can take a minute, and you will often hear the airlines filling up. It also depends on the system your company's equipment uses and how long it was between you opening up the airlines and pulling against them.

    Opening up the airlines happens at about the midpoint of my hooking process, so everything has a chance to air up and be ready to roll by the end.
     
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  7. jgarciajr40

    jgarciajr40 Medium Load Member

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    I'll give it another shot tomorrow.

    I was being a yard dog pretty much after my run, and I was trying to practice hooking up doubles I may of dumped/been low on air without realizing it.

    Iknow the system had air because I could hear the air entering the dolly, and like I said I physically opened the emergency line on the last trailer to verify air was entering the system.

    Ill be honest I didn't look at my air gauge because my Volvo makes a particular noise when it's low on air #millenial
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2020
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  8. LtlAnonymous

    LtlAnonymous Road Train Member

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    Oh no, believe me, we've all done that. The real issue is that you don't know the checklist of what you need before you can start. Building up your air is a big one. You'll know for next time.

    What you're going to do is just figure out how you like to hook doubles up, and then create a checklist. Do the same checklist the same way every day.

    Everyone does it a little different, and every company has a way they like you to do it. If there's a good reason for how they like you to do something, then do it their way. But you'll make it your own.
     
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  9. Redtwin

    Redtwin Road Train Member

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    Whenever I was hooking a set I always left the red knob in that way the dolly and rear trailer air tanks would start filling as soon as I opened the valves.
     
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  10. LtlAnonymous

    LtlAnonymous Road Train Member

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    Every system is a little different. I did that at ABF, but at my current company, I can actually apply the handbrake as well as releasing the emergency brakes before supplying air to the rear trailer, because of our valve system.
     
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  11. Judge

    Judge Road Train Member

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    Wait.
    What’s that beeping noise?
    3E7A157B-7AEC-4586-BF3B-5D3C99D85B89.png
     
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